Vascular Plants

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Sources used to compile this list include Hulten's Flora of Alaska and Neighboring Territories, Hall's Native Plants of Southeast Alaska, Muller's A Preliminary Checklist of the Vascular Plants in Southeastern Alaska. Additionally, when available, range maps in the Flora of North America were consulted. Choices of scientific name primarily follow the Flora of North America, though there are occasional deviations. I also relied on the USDA PLANTS Database for names. Disagreements were typically decided in favor of the Flora of North America.


Contents

Clubmosses, Ferns and Allies (Lycopodiophyta, Pteridophyta)

Isoëtaceae (Quillwort: 4 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Isoëtes echinosporaSpiny-spore QuillwortExpected to occur throughout the region (see FNA range map), but apparently few collections, including at least two on Baranof Island and one on Prince of Wales Island.
Isoëtes maritimaMaritime QuillwortExpected on islands and the northern gulf coast. Apparently only a few collections including from Shelter Island, Prince of Wales Island, Revillagigedo Island, and the Yakutat Forelands.
Isoëtes occidentalisWestern QuillwortPrimary range seems to be well south of the region (FNA Map), though there are apparently a few scattered reports in south coastal Alaska. In Southeast Alaska this species has so far only been reported from Baranof Island.
Isoëtes x truncataQuillwort HybridHybrids of Western Quillwort (Isoëtes occidentalis) with Maritime Quillwort (Isoëtes maritima) or Spiny-spore Quillwort (Isoëtes echinospora) have been given this name and may be found in the region.

Selaginellaceae (Lesser-clubmoss: 4 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Selaginella selaginoidesLow Lesser-clubmossIn Southeast Alaska, this species is expected on islands and the northern mainland (FNA range map). Apparently few collections, but the e-flora BC collections map indicates at least one collection from the southern mainland, as well as other reports from the BC coastal mainland not far south of the border. (Given the somewhat odd distribution, perhaps this is a candidate species to check for evidence of genetic isolation in Southeast Alaska glacial refugia.)
Selaginella sibiricaSiberian SpikemossMay only occur in the extreme northeast part of the region where it has been collected outside of Haines on Takhin Ridge. It has also been found just north of the border at White Pass.
Selaginella standleyiStandley's Spike-mossExpected to occur in the far northeast part of the region (FNA range map). Apparently few, if any, collections from Southeast Alaska.
Selaginella wallaceiWallace's SpikemossThis species reaches the northern limits of its range near the southern border. So far only one record from the region on Revillagigedo Island (herbarium record of collection).

Lycopodiaceae (Clubmoss: 11 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Diphasiastrum alpinumAlpine ClubmossSmall, trailing clubmoss with flattened, 4-ranked leaves infrequently found in high elevation forest and tundra and occasionally at lower elevations. In the region, it has been collected more often in the mountains from the lower part of Lynn Canal north.
Diphasiastrum complanatumGround CedarApparently few collections in the region, the distribution of this species seems to favor areas more influenced by continental climates.
Diphasiastrum sitchenseAlaskan ClubmossTrailing club moss with rounded stems found in high elevation forest and tundra. Collections are primarily from the northern half of the region on mountains near the Gulf of Alaska, though it is unclear whether this represents the actual distribution accurately.
Huperzia haleakalaeAlpine Fir-mossFairly common larger clubmoss of (sub)alpine tundra where it is the only Huperzia typically found. Formerly considered a part of H. selago. Collection status throughout the region is not entirely clear due to older collections still labeled H. selago.
Huperzia miyoshianaPacific Fir-moss
Huperzia occidentalisWestern Fir-moss
Lycopodiella inundataBog ClubmossKnown from south of Fredrick Sound (including the southern half of Baranof Island), though FNA Range map implies it is to be expeted throughout much of the region. In 2009 a collection was made on Chichagof Island. Can be abundant where found, but reports have been infrequent, with only a few collections from the region.
Lycopodium annotinumStiff ClubmossCommon throughout the region with many collections. Found in forests and muskegs from sea level to subalpine.
Lycopodium clavatumRunning ClubmossFound mostly in open areas from low elevation to subalpine. This species may reach the northern extent of its regular range in the region (FNA map), though it is probably fairly common throughout. Collections have been made throughout the region (though see L. lagopus).
Lycopodium dendroideumTree ClubmossExpected throughout the region (FNA range map), collections of this species are mostly from about Frederick Sound south (including mid-Baranof Island).
Lycopodium lagopusOne-cone ClubmossExpected from the far northern mainland part of the region (FNA range map). As of late 2013, only one collection currently in Arctos (from the Juneau Ice Field) - perhaps some older ones are still labeled L. clavatus?

Ophioglossaceae (Adder’s Tongue: 16 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Botrychium alaskenseAlaska GrapefernExpected in to occur in the region, though it is unclear which parts of it, and where (if?) it has been collected in Southeast Alaska. This species was described in 2002 (?) and is so far known to occur only in Alaska and Yukon Territories.
Botrychium ascendensTriangle-lobe MoonwortDescribed in 1986 and known in our region from beaches of the Yakutat Forelands, this species has a scattered distribution across North America and may be present elsewhere in the region.
Botrychium campestreSlender MoonwortApparently rare throughout much of its range, this species has been found near Yakutat.
Botrychium hesperiumWestern MoonwortMay occur in the far northern mountains along the border with Canada (see map on the pdf linked in references).
Botrychium lanceolatumLance-leaved GrapefernMay be expected throughout the region, but so far apparently collected only on the northern mainland between Yakutat and Haines.
Botrychium lunariaMoonwortExpected to occur throughout the region, it appears most collections are from on or adjacent to the northern mainland, with a collection from Lisanski Strait and another from Coronation Island being exceptions.
Botrychium minganenseMingan MoonwortExpected throughout the region, apparently collections in Southeast Alaska so far have only been made from northern Chichagof Island and the northern mainland from Lynn Canal west to Yakutat.
Botrychium montanumMountain MoonwortApparently found near the northwestern-most edge of the region. This species has also been found to the south in BC, and may occur elsewhere in the region, though its small size may make it easily to overlook.
Botrychium neolunariaCommon MoonwortSpecies not yet formally described. (See pdf linked below for more) Expected throughout the region.
Botrychium pedunculosumStalked MoonwortNot currently known from Southeast Alaska, the nearest report of this species appears to be from British Columbia a ways inland from Prince Rupert. There is also a population that has been found well to the west on the Alaska Peninsula.
Botrychium pinnatumNorthwestern MoonwortExpected throughout the region, there are apparently currently very few collections of this species from Southeast Alaska (mostly out of Haines). This species has been considered at subspecies of B. boreale and may be labeled as such in herbarium records.
Botrychium spathulatumSpatulate MoonwortKnown from stabilized maritime sand dunes on Kruzof Island this species may be expected to occur elsewhere in the region. It is quite similar in appearance to Triangle-lobe Moonwort (Botrychium ascendens) (see pdf linked below for a table of characters used to differentiate the two).
Botrychium tunuxMoosewortThis recent described species is known from the Yakutat area. Previously considered part of B. neolunaria (though B. neolunaria is not yet formerly described - so perhaps this should be B. lunaria?)
Botrychium yaaxudakeitGiant MoonwortDescribed in 2002 from collections made at sandy beaches near Yakutat. Plants of this species had formerly been considered B. neolunaria.
Botrypus virginianusRattlesnake FernScattered collections from Coronation Island north, though coastal collections to the south suggest this species could be expected to occur infrequently throughout much of the region.
Sceptridium multifidumLeathery GrapefernExpected throughout the region, though so far apparently reported no further south than Baranof Island and Admiralty Island (though there are many reports from Haida Gwaii and other locations in coastal BC).

Equisetaceae (Horsetails: 10 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Equisetum arvenseCommon HorsetailAlmost certainly common throughout the region in open or disturbed areas from low elevation to the subalpine. Extensive areas of the region have few or no collections of this species (perhaps because of its ubiquity).
Equisetum fluviatileSwamp HorsetailExpected throughout the region. Probably more widespread than collections (scattered, mostly on the mainland) may indicate. May be abundant where it grows in shallow waters or marshy habitats.
Equisetum hyemaleCommon Scouring-rushExpected throughout the region, though apparently very few collections (note: Arctos has E. hiemale for some records; and many that are not georeferenced that may include SE Alaska material).
Equisetum palustreMarsh HorsetailExpected throughout the region (FNA Range map), this species has apparently only been collected from a few scattered locations on the mainland in Southeast Alaska (pending review of many non-georeferenced records in Arctos).
Equisetum pratenseMeadow HorsetailExpected throughout the region (FNA map), but apparently very few collections (pending review of non-georeferenced arctos records). Has been reported from Coronation Island and Chichagof Island.
Equisetum scirpoidesDwarf ScouringrushExpected to occur on the northern mainland and outer islands (FNA map). Apparently few, if any, collections from the region (pending review of non-georeferenced records in Arctos)
Equisetum sylvaticumWoodland horsetailExpected on northern mainland and southern outer islands (FNA map). Few collections from the region (pending review of many non-georeferenced arctos records).
Equisetum telmateiaGiant HorsetailExpected on the outer islands (FNA map), it is unclear on what basis this inclusion was made. Reported from Haida Gwaii south of the region, but no reports of this species in Southeast Alaska have yet been discovered.
Equisetum variegatumVariegated Scouring-rushFound throughout with several collections made from throughout the region. Scattered in occurrence but sometimes abundant where it is found.
Equisetum x litoraleHorsetail HybridExpected throughout the region (FNA map) it is unclear how often this hybrid between E. arvense and E. fluviatile occurs.

Hymenophyllaceae (Filmy Fern: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Hymenophyllum wrightiiFilmy FernA very small fern only documented as a gametophyte in Southeast Alaska. H. wrightii gametophytes resemble unbranched leafy liverworts. Expected in the southern half of the region (FNA map), there are few collections - likely due to ease with which they would be overlooked where they grow on decaying wood in a variety of low elevation forest types.

Aspleniaceae (Spleenworts: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Asplenium adulterinumAdulterated SpleenwortOfficially known only from Vancouver Island, the FNA account of this hybrid between Maidenhair Spleenwort (Asplenium trichomanes) and Green Spleenwort (Asplenium trichomanes-ramosum) suggests it could be expected elsewhere. A plant with the (apparently diagnostic, key-wise) character of partially brown rachis was photographed (but not collected) at Red Bluff Bay.
Asplenium trichomanesMaidenhair SpleenwortSmall evergreen fern with ovate pinnae which is expected to occur, but seems to be less common than A. trichomanes-ramosum. Two subspecies indicated in FNA, with ssp. trichomanes expected in the southern half of the region (FNA map) on acidic substrates, while ssp. quadrivalens (which occurs on limestone) not thought to occur in the region (FNA map). However, most collections from Southeast Alaska have been made from limestone, so further investigation may be warranted.
Asplenium trichomanes-ramosumGreen SpleenwortExpected throughout much of the region. Collections seem to primarily be from outer islands and the northern mainland. Seems to be scattered, though can be locally fairly common, especially in some limestone areas on the ultramafic bluffs at Red Bluff Bay.

Blechnaceae (Chain Ferns: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Blechnum spicantDeer FernFairly Common evergreen rosette forming fern found in forests and occasionally in shady open areas. Expected throughout the region, though there are fewer collections in the Arctos database from the northern areas. Whether this is indicative of lesser (more scattered) occurrence, or an artifact of collection effort is unclear.

Dennstaedtiaceae (Bracken Ferns: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Pteridium aquilinumBracken FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map) where it reaches the northern extent of its range. There are scattered collections from much of the area (except the Northern Gulf Coast), though most have not been geo-referenced (and so do not show up on the e-Flora BC map). This species is apparently most often found at the transition between muskeg and coniferous forest.

Dryopteridaceae (Wood Ferns: 20 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Athyrium alpestreAlpine Lady FernExpected through at least the southern half of the region (FNA map), this species has apparently only been collected in Southeast Alaska a few times, with one record from northern Chichagof Island.
Athyrium filix-feminaCommon Lady FernCommon large deciduous fern of forest openings and open forest. Occasionally forming nearly pure stands. Expected to be common throughout the region, across most of Southeast Alaska, there just a few collections of this species in Arctos that have been geo-referenced.
Cystopteris fragilisFragile FernFairly Common fern typically found on wet cliffs. Quite a few collections of this species have been made from sites scattered throughout the region.
Cystopteris montanaMountain Bladder FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map). Collections from the southern outer islands, Chichagof Island, one on Admiralty Island, and the mainland north of Haines.
Dryopteris carthusianaSpinulose WoodfernNot currently known from Southeast Alaska, this species has been collected just across the border from Haines as well as at Bennett Lake on the other side of White Pass. It is known from several collections on Haida Gwaii as well as other coastal areas of BC just south of our region. A different than typical fern found near treeline on Bear Mountain in 2012 may be this species.
Dryopteris expansaSpreading Wood FernMedium to large sized fern common in moderately to higly productive forests. Occasionally fronds remain green through winter.
Dryopteris fragransFragrant shield fernExpected on the northern mainland mountains, but apparently few, if any, collections from Southeast Alaska.
Gymnocarpium disjunctumPacific OakfernCommon deciduous fern found in most productive forests, often in large colonies in riparian forest. Expected throughout the region, apparently only a few collections from both the south and north, but none in the central part (seems likely there are older collections still labeled G. dryopteris). Hybrids with G. dryopteris should be expected.
Gymnocarpium dryopterisWestern OakfernExpected and probably common throughout the region, some collections labeled as this species may be G. disjunctum. Hybrids with G. disjunctum should be expected.
Polystichum andersoniiAnderson's Holly FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map) collections from the region have primarily been made near Juneau, Ketchikan, or Sitka, with apparently only a handful from other locations, including Yakobi Island, Glacier Bay, north Chichagof Island and Coronation Island.
Polystichum brauniiBraun's Holly FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map), there are quite a few collections from locations scattered throughout. FNA notes that hybrids with P. lonchitis are known from Southeast Alaska.
Polystichum kruckebergiiKruckeberg's HollyfernFound on ultramafic rock outcrops which are limited in the region. Locations were this species has been collected include Red Bluff Bay, the Cleveland Peninsula, and Annette Island.
Polystichum kwakiutliiKnown only from the type specimen collected not far south of the border in coastal BC. FNA notes: "This species is presumed to be one of the diploid progenitors of P . andersonii . It should be sought among the boreal 2-pinnate polystichums, from which it can be distinguished by the presence of bulblets. Polystichum kwakiutlii differs from P . andersonii in its completely divided pinnae and entire indusia."
Polystichum lonchitisNorthern Holly FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map), there appear to be a fair number of collections from locations scattered throughout much of Southeast Alaska.
Polystichum munitumWestern Sword FernExpected in the southern half of the region (FNA map), collections of this species have been made as far north as the southern end of Baranof Island.
Polystichum setigerumAlaska Holly FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map), this species seems to be primarily be a Northwest Coast endemic (with a disjunct occurrence on Attu Island), ranging only from coastal Southern BC through Southeast Alaska. Collections have been made from scattered locations throughout the region.
Woodsia alpinaAlpine Cliff FernExpected on far northern mainland as well as the northern outer islands (FNA map), this species has apparently only been collected a handful of times in Southeast Alaska, and perhaps only once since the 1930s.
Woodsia glabellaSmooth Cliff FernExpected to be more inland, but apparently rare in the region - reported from Admiralty Island, the Ketchikan area, and Misty Fjords. (The latter two reported in Hall 2010, but there do not appear to be collection records in Arctos for those locations.)
Woodsia ilvensisRusty WoodsiaExpected on the northern mainland (FNA map), there only a few collectioned georeferenced in Arctos. These include some from Mendenhall Glacier, one from Glacier Bay and one from Chichagof Island. Additional records from Southeast Alaska could be in the set of non-georeferenced collections.
Woodsia scopulinaMountain Cliff FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map), apparently few collections from Southeast Alaska (only one in Arctos, linked below).

Polypodiaceae (Polypody Ferns: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Polypodium glycyrrhizaLicorice FernCommon fern of low elevations. Grows as epiphyte and on open rocks and cliffs. Expected throughout the region (FNA map), there are apparently only a few (geo-referenced) collections from Southeast Alaska. (Further searches in Arctos may reveal additional collections without coordinates.)

Pteridaceae (Maidenhair Ferns: 4 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Adiantum aleuticumMaidenhair FernPerennial fern with fan-shaped delicate fronds common on wet cliffs and forested wet areas, especially on slopes and rocky areas. Expected throughout the region, except possibly the far northern parts (FNA map), this species has been collected (in Arctos as A. pedatum) widely throughout the region south of Juneau and Icy Strait, though most collections appear to be from islands.
Cryptogramma acrostichoidesAmerican RockbrakeExpected throughout the region (FNA map). Collections have been made from scattered locations throughout. Hybrids with C. sitchensis may occur.
Cryptogramma sitchensisSitka RockbrakeExpected throughout the region (FNA map), most collections in the region appear to be from the northern half. (Whether this is due to differences in frequency or an artifact of sampling effort is unclear.)
Cryptogramma stelleriFragile RockbrakeExpected throughout the region on sheltered calcareous cliff crevices and rock ledges (FNA map), there are apparently very few collections in the region. One from northern Prince of Wales Island was described as being found "in narrow crevice of limestone, near base of cliff, well-shaded"

Thelypteridaceae (Marsh Ferns: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Phegopteris connectilisNorthern Beech FernExpected (and probably common) throughout the region (FNA map), there are only a few collections, mostly from the southern part of the area and around Haines. Checking the non-georeferenced collections in Arctos may reveal additional collections as well.
Thelypteris quelpaertensisQueen's-veil Maiden FernExpected throughout the region (FNA map), the georeferenced collections are mostly from the southern part of Southeast Alaska, with one from Lisianski Strait. Review of non-georeferenced collections in Arctos may reveal additional collections.


Conifers (Pinophyta)

Cupressaceae (Cyprus: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Chamaecyparis nootkatensisYellow CedarExpected throughout the region, this species is locally abundant in some areas, but has also been subject to Yellow Cedar Decline over the past 100+ years, resulting in extensive cedar death. This species is the subject of on-going study and the effects of climate change.
Juniperus communisCommon JuniperAn easily over-looked evergreen shrub. The needle-shaped leaves are blue-green during the growing season, often brown or grey in the winter. In some locations, this species may be very common, but more often scattered. Expected throughout the region, collections are scattered throughout much, with some significant gaps, most prominently West Chichagof and the Northern Gulf Coast. (Pending review of non-georeferenced collections in Arctos)
Thuja plicataWestern Red CedarExpected throughout the southern half of the region (excepting Baranof Island).

Pinaceae (Pine: 8 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Abies amabilisPacific Silver FirKnown from the extreme southeastern part of the region. A handful of collections from Revillagigedo Island and the mainland south of there.
Abies lasiocarpaSubalpine FirReported (and rumored) from scattered (sometimes isolated) locations throughout much of the region, collections of this species come from three primary areas, the coast mountains east of Lynn Canal, the coast mountains near Hyder, southern outer islands - Dall and Prince of Wales.
Picea glaucaWhite SpruceIt is unclear whether this species occurs in pure form in the region. Trees of hybrid origin of this species and P. sitchensis are known from northern river valleys and could reach the border along other transboundary rivers.
Picea sitchensisSitka SpruceVery common from sea level to the Montane Forest. Occassionally found in stunted form in subalpine and alpine habitats. Also may be found in a stunted form on small islets and wet meadows or fens. Attains largest size in well drained valley bottoms. Scattered collections from throughout the full length of the region but with many gaps - perhaps because the species is so common, there was little need to collect it.
Pinus contortaShore Pinevar. contorta expected throughout the region, with var. latifolia expected to occur in some locations where it has moved down transboundary rivers, especially in the north. Scattered collections from throughout much of the region, though much less on the outer islands.
Pseudotsuga menziesiiDouglas FirPlanted in some locations as a landscaping/ornamental tree.
Tsuga heterophyllaWestern HemlockAbundant in the region as the dominant species in many forested areas. There are collections from much of the region, but with significant gaps, perhaps due to this tree's ubiquity.
Tsuga mertensianaMountain HemlockThis coniferous tree often the dominant tree in montane forests near treeline. It is the most typical clump forming tree in subalpine parkland that also is commonly found growing in krummholz at exposed locations in the mountains. In muskegs and mixed scrubby stands at lower elevations it is still found, though less commonly. Although probably common throughout the region in its preferred habitats, there are only about 25 collections of this species in Arctos (with the biggest gap being from north of Sitka up along the Northern Gulf Coast - where perhaps it is less common? Also, with the exception of the single collection at Sitka, there are not really any collections from the central part of the region. )

Taxaceae (Yew: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Taxus brevifoliaPacific YewOnly a few collections (6 in arctos), all from the extreme southern part of the region, including Prince of Wales, Dog Island, and Revillagigedo Island. Collection notes indicate it can be common to abundant where it is found.


Dicots (Magnoliopsida)

Aceraceae (Maple: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Acer glabrumDouglas MapleOne of the few species of deciduous trees found in southeastern Alaska. Douglas Maple can be locally common (Shaman Island near Douglas), but for the most part maple tends to be unusual to rare. Widely collected from north to south, there are no collections from the outer coast. (Does it prefer a somewhat less than hypermaritime climate, or is it just poorly documented?)

Adoxaceae ( 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Adoxa moschatellinaMusk rootNo collections in arctos from Southeast Alaska (though the species is widespread throughout much of the rest of the state). A single collection from Juneau (in 1952) is included on the e-Flora BC map. There is also a collection from Mile 83 of the Haines highway just across the border.
Sambucus racemosaRed ElderberryCommon shrub with some weedy habits. Found mostly in open and disturbed habitats. Many collections from throughout the region.
Viburnum eduleHighbush CranberryQuite a few collections from throughout much of the region. No collections from Baranof Island nor Admiralty Island, though this species presumably occurs there.

Amaranthaceae (Amaranth: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Amaranthus albusProstrate PigweedMuller included it as being introduced in the Juneau area, but there are no collection records in Arctos, nor on the e-Flora BC map. Species is included in AKEPIC, but no records indicated for Southeast Alaska. Perhaps this species is not really established?
Amaranthus retroflexusRedroot PigweedReported from the Sitka area (both on the Muller checklist, as well as on AKEPIC info sheet), though there are no collections in Arctos, nor any reflected on the e-flora BC maps, and AKEPIC does not have it occurring in recent surveys for non-native species, so it seems likely this species is not established.

Apiaceae (Carrot: 14 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Angelica genuflexaKneeling AngelicaFairly common herbaceous plant with pinnately compound genuflecting leaves and umbrella-like clusters of flowers found in wet areas (non-bog?), including stream sides, lake margins, and beach meadows. Collections widespread throughout the region, though with some significant gaps, including southern outer islands, the central islands and mainland, northern inner islands, and Glacier Bay.
Angelica lucidaSeacoast AngelicaFairly common plant of open areas including beach and subalpine meadows. Poorly collected through much of the region (though presumed to be at least fairly common throughout). Collections appear to be limited to the extreme south and from Juneau north along the mainland (including Yakutat).
Cicuta douglasiiWestern Water HemlockApparently scattered throughout the region. Few collection records from the central part (none away from the Stikine River).
Cnidium cnidiifoliumJakutsk SnowparsleySingle collection record in arctos appears to be Pacific Hemlock-parsley (Conioselinum gmelinii) that has been mis-named in the database.
Conioselinum gmeliniiPacific Hemlock-parsleyMost common along the upper beaches and meadows. Can also be found at higher elevations even up to sub-alpine meadows. Many collections from throughout the region (mostly under synonym C. pacificum).
Glehnia littoralisPacific SilvertopAlthough considered to occur on sandy beaches throughout southeast, it has so far been collected only at Yakutat, with reports from Kruzof Island. (Limited to outer coast?)
Heracleum maximumCow ParsnipVery common large herb with hairy stems, ternately compound leaves and tall stalks with umbelliferous inflorescences. Found from sea level to the subalpine in open (mostly well-drained) areas and forest margins. Scattered collections from throughout the region. Probably under collected relative to its distribution and abundance.
Ligusticum calderiCalder's LovageEndemic to coastal area between northern Vancouver Island and extreme southern Southeast Alaska. Only a hand full of collections from the region, all from Dall Island or southern Prince of Wales Island.
Ligusticum scoticumBeach LovageFairly common but restricted to rocky seashores above all but the highest of fall and winter tides. Expected throughout the region in this habitat. Scattered collections throughout much of the region.
Oenanthe sarmentosaPacific Water-parsleyProbably throughout the region in suitable wet habitat, but only a few scattered collections apart from southern inner islands (Revillagigedo Island south) and mainland.
Osmorhiza berteroiMountain Sweet-cicelyProbably throughout, but few collections in much of the region. Most collections are from Juneau north, with a handful of scattered collections to the south. (Less common than Purple Sweet-cicely (Osmorhiza purpurea)?)
Osmorhiza depauperataBlunt-fruit Sweet-cicelyCollected only from the northern mainland near border with Canada. Overall distribution appears to be primarily continental, and it should perhaps not be expected throughout much of the more maritime parts of the region.
Osmorhiza purpureaPurple Sweet-cicelyOne of the first spring flowers, this plant is fairly common in open forested areas, and abundant in riparian alder forest. Widely collected throughout much of the region.
Pastinaca sativaWild ParsnipNo collections from the region in arctos are indicated on e-flora BC maps. Also not indicated for the region in AKEPIC. Introduced species would not seem to be established in the region.

Apocynaceae ( 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Apocynum androsaemifoliumSpreading DogbaneNo collections from Southeast Alaska. In northern part of its range it appears to be restricted to more continental climates, so if it occurs, it is probably only at the northeastern margins of the region.

Araliaceae (Ginseng: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Oplopanax horridusDevil's ClubCommon robust shrub with abundant thorn on stems and underside of large maple-shaped leaves. Most abundant in steep areas or alluvial forests. From sea level to subalpine. Collections from throughout much of the region.

Asteraceae (Asters: 107 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Achillea millefoliumYarrowPerennial aromatic herb with finely dissected leaves and small white compound flowers commonly found in meadows, cliffs and well drained disturbed locations from sea level to subalpine. Collections from throughout the region.
Achillea ptarmicaSneezeweedApparently no more than a couple of collections from the region. One in arctos (from an old garden site at False Island on Chichagof Island). In addition, AKEPIC includes reports from Gustavus, Juneau, and the Stikine River (or Zarembo, georeferenced location and description do not match).
Agoseris aurantiacaMountain DandelionCollected from Glacier Bay and the northern mainland (including upper Lynn Canal and the St. Elias mountains near Yakutat. Overall range appears to be mainly in continental mountains.
Agoseris glaucaPale AgoserisSeveral collections from the northeastern mainland. A single collection in arctos from just across the border near Hyder. Overall range seems to be primarily in the mountains away from the coast.
Ambrosia chamissonisSilver BurreedOnly three widely separated collections, the first (in 1993) from Yakutat at the far north end of the region, the second (in 2003) from the middle of the region on Kruzof Island, and the last near the southern-most extreme of the region on Kanagunut Island (in 2005).
Anaphalis margaritaceaPearly EverlastingA fairly common gray green herb with round, white clusters of small flowers. Most frequently found on road sides, also found along gravel bars. Collections spanning the region, but with significant gaps (e.g., no Baranof Island or Southern Island collection records in Arctos).
Antennaria alpinaAlpine Pussy-toesCollections primarily from northern mainland, but also a couple from southern mainland. One from Prince of Wales Island another from Admiralty Island are the only island collections.
Antennaria mediaDark PussytoesPerhaps ultimately best considered within Alpine Pussy-toes (Antennaria alpina), kept separate for now following FNA. Appears to be considered synonymous with A. alpina in Arctos records. It is unclear how many collections of this species/form have been made in Southeast Alaska.
Antennaria monocephalaOne-flowered Pussy-toesCollection records mostly from mainland mountains north of Juneau/Glacier Bay. One island collection from the north end of Admiralty Island.
Antennaria pulcherrimaShowy pussy-toesOverall range appears to be more continental. In the region there are a pair of collections from Gustavus and another two from Haines.
Antennaria roseaRosy Pussy-toesCollections in the region primarily from the northern mainland, with one collection from Baranof Island (Glacier Lake).
Antennaria umbrinellaUmber PussytoesStatus of this species is unclear, although considered to occur throughout by Muller, most records in Arctos that show up when searching for this species are labeled Antennaria rosea ssp pulvinata. FNA does not list this as a synonym of A. umbrinella (or vice versa), and does not indicate this species as occurring in Alaska. Records shown on e-flora BC map indicate a more interior distribution, and if this species does occur in the region, it's probably along the margins.
Anthemis cotulaMayweedNo collections in Arctos, AKEPIC reports only three observations from Skagway (2009), near Kook Lake on Chichagof Island (2005), and Rowan Bay (2004).
Anthemis tinctoriaYellow ChamomileApparently no collections or reports from the region.
Arctanthemum arcticumArctic DaisyApparently reaches the southern extent of its range on the eastern Pacific coast in the region. Collections from the outer coast of Southeast Alaska are limited to Yakutat area and a single collection along the north side of Icy Strait. A record from Freshwater Bay on eastern side of Chichagof Island the only one on an outer island. There are scattered collections from the Stikine River mouth north to Skagway on the mainland and inner islands.
Arnica angustifoliaNarrow leaf arnicaOnly a couple of collections from the Haines vicinity. Seems likely to be limited to the northern continental margins of the region.
Arnica chamissonisLeafy ArnicaApparently only four collections from the region in ARCTOS and/or e-Flora BC. North Prince of Wales Island, Mitkof Island, Haines, and Dry Bay.
Arnica cordifoliaHeart-leaved ArnicaApparently only collection from Southeast Alaska was made near Haines. Overall range appears to be more continental, so probably limited to margins of region.
Arnica griscomiiSnow ArnicaSoutheast Alaska appears to be at the southwestern limits of the range of this species. Only a single collection from the region in ARCTOS, from Mitkof Island. A second collection from near Haines is in a different herbarium. Mitkof Island records appears to be something of an outlier (both in terms of range and expected habitat), and this species is probably only to be expected along the north eastern margins of the region.
Arnica lanceolataClasping ArnicaFairly common perennial herb with yellow daisy-like flowers found in riparian areas, meadows and along roadsides.

Taxonomic changes make tracking collections a little difficult. In ARCTOS, most seem to be linked with A. lanceolata, while in e-Flora BC, more are associated strictly with A. lanceolata ssp. prima.

In ARCTOS, collections from throughout much of the region, though more weighted towards the outer coast. Gaps in the extreme south, and in the central inner islands and mainland, but probably occurs throughout.
Arnica latifoliaBroad-leaf ArnicaProbably somewhat common herb with yellow daisy-like flowers and 2-4 pairs of opposite leaves. Collections from throughout, though more in the northeastern part of the region. Only three collections from outer islands, and none from the central mainland.
Arnica lessingiiNodding ArnicaSeveral collections, mostly from the northern part of the region. A single collection from northern Prince of Wales Island, and another from Dall Island are the only collections in ARCTOS south of Chichagof Island (though it has been reported from Baranof Island, as well).
Arnica lonchophyllaLongleaf arnicaApparently no collections from close to the region. Probably does not occur.
Arnica mollisHairy ArnicaSingle collection from Shakes Lake in 1993. Even assuming collection is correctly assigned, it is not clear whether this species is established in the region, as Southeast Alaska would appear to be near the northwestern-most limits of the regular range (though there are a handful of collections from further west in Alaska). However, other collections from northwestern British Columbia suggest the possibility that this species could occur at the northern margins of the region.
Arnica ovataSticky Leaf ArnicaA single collection from a Juneau Icefield nunatak in 1982 is the only one for the region. It was reported to be common in the location it was collected.
Artemisia alaskanaSiberian wormwoodNearest collections appear to be near the British Columbia/Yukon border north of Haines. Given primary range (northern/continental), this species, if it occurs at all in Southeast Alaska, probably only occurs at the very northern edges.
Artemisia campestrisField sagewortStatus of this species is unclear. There are no collections from the region indicated on the maps for either ARCTOS or eflora-BC (nor any even particularly close). However, there quite a few collections in ARCTOS without georeferencing, some of which may be from Southeast Alaska. Both Muller and Hall note this species as occurring, however perhaps there have been taxonomic changes.
Artemisia dracunculusTarragonCollected along the Stikine River at a spot georeferenced as just on the Canadian side of the border. Given overall range, it is likely to occur only at margins of region, if at all.
Artemisia frigidaPrarie SagewortNo collections from the region, but one collection just across the border along the Stikine River. If this species occurs in the region, it is probably only at the margins.
Artemisia furcataForked WormwoodSingle collection from the Alsek River is the only record from the region. Overall more northerly distribution suggests this species is likely to be rare and/or absent in most of Southeast Alaska.
Artemisia norvegicaBoreal SagebrushCommon plant of meadows near treeline. Also found on gravel bars of larger rivers. Several collections from both the southern part of the region as well as the northern mainland. Only a couple of collections from the northern islands.
Artemisia tilesiiTilesius' wormwoodKnown primarily from the northern mainland with collections from the upper end of Lynn Canal as well as the St. Elias Mountains and Harlequin Lake outside of Yakutat. Additional collections from just across the border on the Taku and Stikine Rivers, suggest it could occur in those areas as well. A single 2009 collection from near Hoonah is the only island record. The overall range of this species is more northern, and Southeast Alaska appears to be at the southern edge of its range.
Bidens frondosaDevil's beggartickWeedy annual native to North America Although reported in Muller and indicated for the region on the FNA distribution map, there are no collections of this species in ARCTOS nor any reports on the e-Flora BC map. The nearest are from the vicinity of Vancouver, BC, well to the south. AKEPIC also does not show any reports for the region.
Canadanthus modestusGiant Mountain AsterAbundance unclear. Seems like it may be possibly confused with Sub-alpine Daisy (Erigeron peregrinus) or Douglas Aster (Symphyotrichum subspicatum)

Collections primarily from the northern (inside) mainland. A single collection from the Stikine River is the only one on the mainland south of Juneau. A collection from Game Creek on Chichagof Island, and another from near Craig on Prince of Wales Island are the only island records.

Southeast Alaska is at the northern end of the overall range (a couple collections in southern Yukon are the only north of the region). In western Canada and the Pacific Northwest, there appears to be only limited collections from near the coast, so perhaps much of Southeast Alaska is marginal climate-wise for this species?
Centaurea montanaPerennial CornflowerCommon ornamental in many communities, may have started to go feral in some locations, but does not yet seem to be naturalized in the region. Collections in ARCTOS from Hyder and Juneau. Considered potentially invasive, AKEPIC data includes reports from other communities in the region as well.
Centaurea stoebeSpotted KnapweedIntroduced and potentially invasive species. AKEPIC indicates reports of this species from several communities throughout the region.
Cirsium arvenseCanada ThistleSeveral collections in Arctos, with many additional reports AKEPIC from communities throughout the region. Also a few reports from remote areas, mostly where logging activity has occurred (in particular, roads).
Cirsium eduleEdible thistleOnly collection in ARCTOS is apparently from the British Columbia side of the border near Hyder. Southern Southeast Alaska would seem to be at the very northern edge of the range of this species.
Cirsium foliosumLeafy thistle, Elk thistleNo confirmed occurrence of this species in Alaska, the collections/reports indicated on e-Flora BC maps are all from from the Rocky Mountains well inland, so it seems unlikely this species occurs in the region.
Cirsium vulgareBull ThistleIntorduced species considered a noxious weed. Has been reported as far north as Haines, but most reports are from the southern part of the region.
Conyza canadensisCanadian HorseweedSingle 1982 collection from logging camp site is the only record for the region. Seems unlikely to be established.
Cotula coronopifoliaCommon BrassbuttonsOnly two collections in Arctos, both from Mitkof Island in the same bay. A third collection is indicated in the AKEPIC fact sheet for this species.
Crepis capillarisSmooth HawksbeardCollections in Arctos from Skagway and Wrangel as well as two remote sites with human disturbance (logging or mining). Apparently no other documented reports.
Crepis elegansElegant HawksbeardNo collections in ARCTOS from the region. The e-flora BC map indicates some reports/collections from the Haines triangle of BC. It appears the primary range of this species is more interior and/or northern.
Crepis nanaDwarf Alpine HawksbeardNo collections from the region in Arctos or indicated in e-flora BC, though the latter has a 1956 collection from mile 75 of Haines highway, just across the border. Overall distribution suggests if this species occurs in the region, it is most in the mountains of the northern border.
Crepis tectorumNarrowleaf HawksbeardIntroduced species. Has been reported (see AKEPIC data) in many locations throughout much of the region, especially on Prince of Wales and around Haines and Skagway.
Erigeron acrisBitter FleabaneSeveral collections from the northern mainland (in the vicinity of Gustavus and Haines/Skagway). Two additional collections from Hyder area. A single 2007 collection from Kosciusko Island is the only island record.
Erigeron compositusCut-leaved daisy1979 collection from the Haines Highway is the only one from region in Arctos, with an additional one from just across the border near Atlin Lake.
Erigeron denaliiDenali fleabaneNo collections of this species from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS, though one collection said to be from Yukon appears to be georeferenced just on the Alaska side of the border between Yakutat Bay and Icy Bay.
Erigeron glacialisSubalpine FleabaneTreated as a subspecies of Sub-alpine Daisy (Erigeron peregrinus) in e-Flora BC, FNA considers has it as a species.

No collection records of this taxa in the state in ARCTOS, though a plant found in Sitka was initially identified as this species.

https://archive.org/details/biostor-159535
Erigeron humilisAlpine FleabanePerennial herb with purplish, hairy foliage and stems single white daisy-like flowers. Higher elevations, limestone outcrops, and recently deglaciated areas. Scattered collections, more from the northern part of the region. Not collected from Chichagof or Baranof Islands, though it has been reported from both.
Erigeron lonchophyllusSpear-leaf fleabaneNo collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, nor any indication of such from e-Flora BC, where nearest is from mile 86 of Haines highway.
Erigeron peregrinusSub-alpine DaisyPale to dark purple daisy common in meadows and rich fens from sea level to just above treeline. Many collections from throughout much of the region. What gaps are presumed to be from lack of collecting rather than non-occurrence.
Erigeron purpuratusPurple fleabaneNo collections of this species from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS. FNA lists this species as only occurring in Alaska and the Yukon. Status for Southeast Alaska is unclear, but it seems likely to occur only at the very margins, if at all. There has been some disagreement on the status of E. purpuratus. Some souces list it as a synonym of E. pallens, however G. L. Nesom and D. F. Murray (2004) support the seperation of the taxa.
Erigeron uniflorusNorthern DaisyNot known from Southeast Alaska, it has been reported from BC near the Haines Highway not far from the border. The overall range of this species is more northern and continental. If this species does occur in the region, it is almost certainly limited to alpine regions of the mountains near the border.
Eurybia sibiricaArctic astere-flora BC map indicates two ARCTOS collections from mountains along the north gulf coast. ARCTOS nomenclature appears to maybe consider this species synonymous with Sub-alpine Daisy (Erigeron peregrinus), since those also come up in the search for Eurybia sibirica.
Gnaphalium uliginosumSlender CudweedScattered collections or reports from throughout the region in towns or at old log transfer facilities. Appears that it is probably rare (with only a single data report in AKEPIC), so it is unclear to what extent this species is established in the region. AKEPIC also has G. palustre, but calls both species "low cudweed". There are several additional reports of this latter species in the data there, but no collections in ARCTOS, no reports anywhere close to Southeast Alaska on e-Flora BC maps, and FNA does not include this species for Alaska. May need some follow up.
Hieracium albiflorumWhite-flowered HawkweedOnly collections appear to be from upper Lynn Canal, upper Glacier Bay, and near Hyder. Occurrence apart from areas near the border is unclear, perhaps this far north it favors more continental influenced climates.
Hieracium aurantiacumOrange HawkweedIntroduced species with tendencies toward invasiveness. Collections in ARCTOS (from as early as 1960s) were made primarily along the road systems of several different communities in the region. AKEPIC data indicates reports widely distributed reports, especially in southern Southeast Alaska, mainly (but not exclusively) along roads or in other areas of human disturbance.
Hieracium caespitosumMeadow HawkweedNo collections of this species in ARCTOS, but reports from several communities (Juneau, Kake, Petersburg, Wrangell, Ketchikan) and on Prince of Wales in the AKEPIC database.
Hieracium lachenaliiCommon HawkweedSeveral reports (in AKEPIC database) of this species from along the road system of Wrangell Island, as well as Zarembo Island. Apparently no reports from elsewhere in the region.
Hieracium pilosellaMouse-ear HawkweedNo collections in ARCTOS. Known from Prince of Wales Island where there is a single 2006 report (with plants pulled) included in AKEPIC database.
Hieracium tristeWooly HawkweedYellow ray-flowered composite with hairy stems and leaves common in open areas just above treeline. Occasionally found in meadows at lower elevations.

Likely to be present throughout the region in appropriate habitat. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout much of the region, but with some gaps. Many from the Haines/Skagway area.

FNA has lumped H. gracile with this species.
Hieracium umbellatumNarrowleaf HawkweedNo collections in ARCTOS. Reports included in AKEPIC database from several communities or other areas of human use, including Gustavus, Sitka, Petersbug, Wrangell, and Prince of Wales Island.
Hypochaeris radicataHairy Cat's EarsAn introduced species with the potential to be highly invasive. Collections from several communities in the region. Many reports in the AKEPIC database from the southern portion of the region, with fewer from communities in the north.
Lactuca biennisTall Blue LettuceAppears to be uncommon (or at least infrequently collected). Collected from only three locations all along Lynn Canal. Two were in upper beach meadow areas. Unclear how widespread this species is in the region.
Lapsana communisCommon NipplewortTwo collections in ARCTOS, one from Ketchikan (1979) and two from Sitka (first in 1996). Many reports in AKEPIC database, mostly from communities, but also other areas of human activity (roads, logging camps, etc.). Seems to be more common in the southern part of the region.
Leucanthemum vulgareOx-eye DaisyIntroduced species that is common around towns. A few collections in ARCTOS, primarily from Sitka, Ketchikan, Haines, Skagway and Juneau. Many reports in the AKEPIC database from most communities, and also some other areas of human disturbance.
Madia glomerataTarweedCollections from Haines and Skagway. Native to North America, the nearest other collections in e-Flora BC are a small number south and well inland of Southeast Alaska, with most collections being restricted to near the Canadian border with the lower-48. AKEPIC has it included on the non-native species list for Alaska (with a report from Haines).
Matricaria discoideaPineapple WeedAlthough considered introduced by many sources, the FNA account indicates this species actually originates in northwestern North America and has spread from there. AKEPIC has it listed as an introduced species in the state. Only a few collections in ARCTOS (some under M. matricarioides). Many observations from throughout the region in the AKEPIC database. Occurrence away from areas of human disturbance is unclear.
Microseris borealisNorthern MicroserisA west coast endemic. Some patterns of occurrence unclear. For example, common in many Kruzof Island muskegs, but absent from muskegs along the Sitka road system, even though distance is not great. Well collected from southern outer islands, with a few more from southern inner islands. Two old collections from the Sitka area, and one more from the northern mainland along Icy Strait are the only others from the region (there are more from coastal areas north and west of the region). Probably under collected in part, but perhaps also prefers more hyper maritime climate?
Mycelis muralisWall-lettuceA 2004 collection from the vicinity of Ketchikan is all that is in ARCTOS. Many reports of this species from the southern half of the region (not including Baranof Island) in the AKEPIC database.
Packera cymbalariaDwarf Arctic RagwortDespite occurring throughout much of the rest of Alaska (both interior, and more coastal areas at Kodiak Island and the Alaska Penninsula, in Southeast Alaska, this species is only known from the southern outer islands, where it's been collected on Prince of Wales (1979) and Coronation Island (1959). Perhaps this somewhat disjunct occurrence in southern Southeast Alaska (and Haida Gwaii) represents a refugial population that was separated from the main group during the last ice age?
Packera indecoraElegant GroundselFive collections in ARCTOS, all from the northern part of the region. Two at Gustavus and two on the Yakutat Forelands. A 2012 collection at Hoonah is the only island record.
Packera ogotorukensisOgotoruk Creek RagwortTwo collections from Southeast Alaska (Dall Island and Prince of Wales Island) are disjunct from the primary range of this species which is more northerly (including much of mainland Alaska). Is this species absent from much of Southeast Alaska, Rare, or overlooked and/or subject to misidentification?
Packera paucifloraRayless Alpine ButterweedBased on ARCTOS records, the first collections of this species in the region appear to be two made in 1991 near Yakutat. Since that time there has been a third collection near Yakutat and an additional one from Glacier Bay. General range of these species seems to be more continental.
Packera pauperculaBalsam GroundselTwo collections from the region in ARCTOS, one on the Chilkat Peninsula and another at Gustavus. (There are two additional collections from Prince of Wales Island that were previously identified as this species, but have reevaluated and given different names.) Overall distribution in the region is unclear.
Packera streptanthifoliaRocky Mountain GroundselNo collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska. Collections there and on the e-flora BC maps suggest this species is primarily found on the landward side of the coastal mountains, and as such, is perhaps unlikely to be found in Southeast Alaska.
Packera subnudaQueen Charlotte ButterweedCollected from as far north as northern Prince of Wales and Coronation Island, it is also found on other southern outer islands. Endemic to area between northern end of Vancouver Island and southern Southeast Alaska.
Petasites frigidusArctic Sweet ColtsfootPresumed to occur throughout the region. Collections in ARCTOS are primarily from the mainland (but spanning south to north), with only a single collection from Coronation Island that is not on the mainland or a nearby island. Whether this is indicative of a preference for more continental influence resulting in a less common occurrence on outer islands is not clear.
Prenanthes alataWestern Rattlesnake-rootFairly common plant of open areas. Found from sea level to subalpine meadows. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout (except Glacier Bay), including most of the major islands.
Saussurea americanaAmerican Saw-wortOnly nine scattered collections in ARCTOS, with all but two from the year 2000 or later. Collected from Prince of Wales Island, Baranof Island, and Chichagof Island, as well as mainland collections near Juneau and the mountains between Lynn Canal and Glacier Bay. Only a few reports from British Columbia indicated on e-flora BC maps. It's unclear whether this species has been overlooked, or is simply uncommon (with more deliberate efforts to collect it when found in recent years).
Senecio jacobaeaTansy RagwortMay be spreading in the region, or perhaps had been overlooked. Most reports in AKEPIC from disturbed areas in southern Southeast Alaska. Additional collections in ARCTOS from Kruzof Island and Admiralty Island.
Senecio lugensBlack-tipped RagwortARCTOS collections from the region are all from Prince of Wales Island, Dall Island, or Kosciusko Island. It appears that most (maybe all) of the collections are from limestone/karst areas. Overall the distribution of this species is more inland. There are some collections in the e-Flora BC maps from just over the border in the northern part of the region.
Senecio pseudoarnicaSeaside RagwortCollections in ARCTOS mostly from the northern outer part of the region, with a pair at Yakutat, two more on northern Chichagof Island, another two in Sitka Sound, and the only other one from down on Revillagigedo Island. Southeast Alaska is near the southern extent of this species range on the west coast of North America. There are collections from northern Haida Gwaii.
Senecio sheldonensisMt. Sheldon GroundselNot reported from the region - there is an observation from near the Haines highway on the BC side of the border.
Senecio triangularisArrow-leaf RagwortPresumably throughout the region. Collections in ARCTOS span the region, though some of the major islands do not have any associated collections.
Senecio viscosusSticky RagwortBased on reports in AKEPIC, this introduced species appears to be relatively common near Skagway, where it has been for some time (there is an ARCTOS collection from 1968). Additionally, single reports from Haines (in 2007), and Sitka (2008).
Senecio vulgarisCommon GroundselThere a few collections of this introduced species in ARCTOS. Data in AKEPIC indicates it is established in several communities throughout much of the region.
Solidago lepidaCanada GoldenrodPresumably present throughout, there are collections in ARCTOS from most of the region (though some are under S. canadensis and not S. lepida), but not the extreme south.
Solidago multiradiataNorthern GoldenrodExpected to occur throughout. Collections in ARCTOS spanning most of the region with notable gaps including Admiralty Island and the southern inside Islands and mainland.
Solidago simplexSticky GoldenrodNo collections in ARCTOS or on e-Flora BC maps from Southeast Alaska. There are records from the Alsek River and near the Haines Highway not far from the border, so this species may occur at the margins in Southeast Alaska.
Sonchus arvensisField SowthistleThis introduced species has been found in several communities throughout Southeast Alaska. It has also been found on northern Admiralty Island (at what are probably popular recreation sites for Juneau residents).
Sonchus asperSpiny SowthistleIntroduced species so far known from the southern part of the region. Collections in ARCTOS from Sitka and Wrangell, additional reports in AKEPIC from Kake, several locations across Prince of Wales Island, Ketchikan, and Metlakatla (though not from Wrangell or Sitka).
Sonchus oleraceusCommon SowthistleIntroduced species reported (AKEPIC database) from a few communities in the southern half of the region including Sitka, Wrangell, Kake, Ketchikan, and Metlakatla.
Symphyotrichum borealeNorthern bog asterThe primary range of this species appears to be east of the coastal mountains. There is a single collection in ARCTOS identified as this species from Prince of Wales Island. It does not appear the collection has been revisited since the 1979 collection, and considering the overall range of the species and lack of other collections, may be worth confirming the id.
Symphyotrichum foliaceumAlpine Leafybract AsterThe Flora of North America treatments indicates that Symphyotrichum foliaceum var. foliaceum occurs in Southeast Alaska. There no mapped collections in ARCTOS identified (though some collections that are called Douglas Aster (Symphyotrichum subspicatum) are included under a search for S. foliaceum). The FNA treatment of S. subspicatum indicates that species "passes into" this one in Southeast Alaska.
Symphyotrichum subspicatumDouglas AsterCollections from throughout the region (mostly under Aster subspicatus). FNA indicates this species "passes into" Alpine Leafybract Aster (Symphyotrichum foliaceum) in Southeast Alaska.
Tanacetum bipinnatumCommon TansyOnly known from north beach at Shelikof on Kruzof Island, where it has been collected in 2003 and 2013.
Tanacetum vulgareCommon TansyIntroduced species. Only a few collections in ARCTOS, but (usually multiple) records from most communities in the region indicated in the AKEPIC database.
Taraxacum alaskanumAlaska DandelionCollections of this species in ARCTOS from several islands (Hecata Island, Cornation Island, Baranof Island,Chichagof Island, and Admiralty Island as well as the northern mainland (from Juneau north).
Taraxacum ceratophorumHorned DandelionA few collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska including two from southern outer islands, one from the northern gulf coast, and two from the vicinity of Skagway.
Taraxacum officinaleDandelionWidespread throughout much of the region. Most common near towns and at locations with regular human impact, this species has also become naturalized in some remote locations, including shorelines, and stream-side sand and gravel bars.
Taraxacum scopulorumAlpine DandelionThe taxonomy seems a little tricky to tease out, but FNA account implies this species does not occur in Southeast Alaska. Could be plants previously identified as this species are Alaska Dandelion (Taraxacum alaskanum). Collections from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS that come up in a search for this species are either called T. kamtschaticum which in the FNA account is synonymized uner T. alaskanum or T. alaskanum.
Tephroseris frigidaArctic GroundselApparently no collections of this species from the region, there are reports from northern British Columbia not far from the border. The overall range of this species is primarily north of Southeast Alaska, and if this species occurs in the region, it is likely only at the very northern margin.
Tephroseris lindstroemiiNorthern GroundselNo collections from Southeast Alaska, but there are three records mapped on e-Flora BC which are 25-30 miles from the border near the British Columbia border with Yukon along the Haines Highway.
Tephroseris palustrisMarsh FleabaneNo collections from Southeast Alaska. The nearest appears to be a single report from Atlin Lake in British Columbia.

Balsaminaceae (Jewelweed: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Impatiens glanduliferaOrnamental JewelweedReported primarily from Haines and Juneau, though there is a single report in the AKEPIC from Sitka as well.
Impatiens noli-tangereWestern Touch-me-notRare annual herb of meadows, beaches and open forests. A few collections mapped in ARCTOS, mostly on the mainland or near islands from Wrangell north (including Glacier Bay). A single 1950s collection from Kruzof Island is the only one in the western part of the region.

Betulaceae (Birch: 7 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Alnus incanaThinleaf AlderOnly two (georeferenced) collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, one from Juneau, another from Haines. FNA distribution maps has this species occurring only east of the coast range in the vicinity of Southeast Alaska.
Alnus rubraRed AlderDeciduous tree common in riparian areas and disturbed areas at low elevations. Scattered collections in ARCTOS, mostly from the mainland and inner islands, but also Baranof, Chichagof and Coronation Islands.No collections from Prince of Wales and associated outer islands, nor the northern gulf coast. Presumably it occurs throughout most of the region, though northern Southeast Alaska is considered the northern limit of its range.
Alnus viridisSitka AlderCommon deciduous tree-like shrub frequently found along shorelines and colonizing avalanche chutes or mud slide areas. Also found at treeline.

Collections from throughout much of the region, with a few gaps (none from Admiralty Island, for example). FNA suggests ssp crispa does not occur in the region, but rather the very similar ssp fruticosa occurs in the northern part of the region (approx. Juneau/Glacier Bay north).

From FNA account for ssp fruticosa: "This primarily subarctic Asian subspecies has long been mistaken in western North America for Alnus viridis subsp. crispa, which it closely resembles, or for subsp. sinuata (J. J. Furlow 1983b). It can be separated from the former by its larger and more coarsely toothed leaves, and from the latter by its much thicker, mostly single-toothed leaf blades."
Betula glandulosaResin birchFNA map implies range of this species overlaps with Southeast Alaska along the east side of Lynn Canal. Three georeferenced collections of this species from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS are two from near Haines and one on Chichagof Island.


From FNA: "Plants intermediate between Betula glandulosa and B . nana subsp. exilis make up a continuum of forms linking the typical forms of Betula nana and B . glandulosa in parts of Alaska where the ranges of these species overlap. "
Betula nanaDwarf birchFNA map indicates this species range includes the northern mainland of Southeast Alaska. It appears there may not be any (wild) collections that have been determined as this species from Southeast Alaska. ARCTOS includes B. glandulosa in the search results for B. nana.
Betula neoalaskanaAlaska Paper BirchNot collected from the region, the range given in FNA approaches most closely along the southern border of Yukon Territory. If this species does occur, it is likely only at the margins.
Betula papyriferaWestern Paper BirchCollections in ARCTOS from Hyder, Juneau, and upper Lynn Canal.

Boraginaceae (Borage: 14 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Amsinckia lycopsoidesTarweed FiddleneckAlthough included in the preliminary checklist, there are no collections nor any reports of this species in Southeast Alaska, nor in AKEPIC.
Amsinckia menziesiiMenzies' FiddleneckCollections in ARCTOS from Skagway (most recently from 1968). No AKEPIC reports of this species from the region, though there are some in that database from the southern Yukon.
Cryptantha torreyanaTorrey's cryptanthaA single 1968 collection from Skagway in ARCTOS. No additional reports of this species from AKEPIC, nor are there any other reports north of extreme southern British Columbia, suggesting this introduced species may not be established in the region.
Lappula occidentalisStickseedA single collection from Mile 14 of Haines highway is the only one in ARCTOS.
Mertensia maritimaOysterleafCollections in ARCTOS from the northern half the region (from southern Admiralty Island), mostly on inside waters (except also at Yakutat). This species is known to occur on the outside on Kruzof Island as was on Haida Gwaii, so it seems likely this species occurs throughout the region.
Mertensia paniculataTall BluebellThere do not appear to be any collections of this species from the region, though it has been reported (collected?) near the border along the Haines Highway as well as at White Pass. Overall distribution seems to be continental.
Myosotis asiaticaAsian forget-me-notCollections in ARTCOS are called M. alpestris. Only a few collections from the region, including from Ketchikan, Kupreanof Island, three from Chichagof Island (near Freshwater Bay and Tenakee), Auke Bay, and from the mainland mountains outside of Haines. All but the Freshwater Bay and Haines collections are from prior to 1990. Should double check taxonomy. M. asiatica vs. M. alpestris, e-Flora BC appears to treat M. alpestris as a synonym of M. asiatica.
Myosotis laxaBay Forget-me-notNo collections from Southeast Alaska, but e-Flora BC has a record from Stewart, British Columbia just across the border from Hyder. It is also known from Haida Gwaii. If this species occurs in Southeast Alaska, it is almost certainly limited to the southernmost part of the region.
Myosotis scorpioidesForget-me-notCollections in ARCTOS as well as reports in AKEPIC from many of the communities throughout the region.
Myosotis sylvaticaWoodland Forget-me-notAlthough several collections records show up in ARCTOS in a search for this species, none seem to be currently labeled as M. sylvatica. There are reports from Sitka, Hoonah, and Gustavus of this species in AKEPIC.
Plagiobothrys figuratusFragrant Popcorn-flowerAlthough listed in the preliminary checklist, there are no records of this species from the region in ARCTOS. There are also not any reports indicated on e-Flora BC maps, nor in the AKEPIC database.
Plagiobothrys scouleriScouler's Popcorn-flowerA single collection from 1968 near Skagway is the only record of this species from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS. There are no additional reports indicated in e-Flora BC maps, nor AKEPIC database. Taxonomy needs clarification, the ARCTOS collection was relabeled P. cognatus, but currently that appears to be a synonym of P. hispidulus.
Symphytum asperumPrickly ComfreyProbably not established, this species has only been reported from Sitka (1994).
Symphytum officinaleCommon ComfreyNo collections in ARCTOS, but reports from several communities around Southeast Alaska in AKEPIC. Presumably primarily occurs as escaped garden plant, unclear if it has become established anywhere without help.

Brassicaceae (Mustard: 68 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Alliaria petiolataGarlic MustardSo far known only from Juneau, where there has been an infestation documented in the downtown area from 2002 to 2013 (at least) based on data in AKEPIC.
Aphragmus eschscholtzianusAleutian CressNot yet reported; a single report from British Columbia in the small area northwest of Haines. If this species occurs, it is likely to be only at the far northern margins of Southeast Alaska.
Arabidopsis lyrataLyrate RockcressCollected from much of the region, except for there appears to be no (georeferenced) collections in ARCTOS from the far southern inner islands and mainland.
Arabis eschscholtzianaEschscholtz's Hairy RockcressSeveral georeferenced collections identified as this species in ARCTOS, but all are from the mainland. Either this species, or Hairy Rockcress (Arabis pycnocarpa) do occur on at least some islands, but additional investigation is needed.
Arabis nuttalliiNuttalls RockcressNot reported from the region, though there are scattered records from near the border in British Columbia, including along the Alsek River in the north and at Stewart (near Hyder) in the south. If this species does make it into Southeast Alaska, it is probably only at the margins.
Arabis pycnocarpaHairy RockcressA single collection in ARCTOS from the Chilkat Peninsula near Haines. See also Eschscholtz's Hairy Rockcress (Arabis eschscholtziana)
Barbarea orthocerasAmerican YellowrocketAs of 2015, nearly 30 collections from throughout much of the region are cataloged in ARCTOS. Probably present throughout, though perhaps never abundant.
Barbarea vernaEarly YellowrocketAlthough FNA indicates this introduced species is known from Alaska, there are no collection records in ARCTOS. E-flora BC has a single record from the Taku River very near the border.
Boechera divaricarpaUplifting SuncressOnly two collections from the region in ARCTOS, one near Skagway, the other near Haines. Given the overall range of this species, it appears to favor continental type climate.
Boechera lemmoniiLemmon's suncressNo collection from the region. There is a single collection from nunataks in British Columbia not far from the border.
Boechera retrofractaHolboell rockcressA single collection from near Skagway in 2000 is the only collection in ARCTOS. It is labeled as Arabis hoelbellii, but FNA indicates that species is only present in Greenland in North America. E-flora BC has a collection from the Stikine river near the border, as well.
Boechera strictaStraight-up SuncressOnly two georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region, one outside of Haines, the other on the southern tip of Admiralty Island. Additional reports in e-Flora BC from just across the northern border along the highways outside of Haines and Skagway.
Brassica junceaIndia MustardAlthough it was included in the preliminary checklist, there are no collections (ARCTOS) nor recent reports (AKEPIC) of this introduced species.
Brassica rapaField MustardOnly a couple of collections in ARCTOS, but AKEPIC records indicate this species has been found in several communities, and is apparently wide-spread along the beaches in Seymour Canal.
Braya humilisDwarf Northern RockcressThere appears to be two collections from the region. One from limestone on Chichagof Island and a second the Alsek River not far from the border.
Cakile edentulaSea RocketUncommon plant of sandy beaches. Several collections along the outer coast from south Baranof Island north to Yakutat. Additional collections from near Haines, southern Admiralty Island, and the mainland south of Ketchikan.
Cakile maritimaEuropean Sea RocketSo far known from a single collection from Haines in 2000. May be moving north and becoming more common in the future. (See the West coast Cakile project )
Camelina sativaGold of PleasureIntroduced plant reported from the Sitka area in the preliminary checklist, though there are no recent observations of this species (AKEPIC) from the region. FNA says "R. L. McGregor (1985) indicated that Camelina sativa is no longer established in North America; we tend to agree because we have not seen any collections made within the past 40 years."
Capsella bursa-pastorisShepherd's PurseSmall herb with distinctive heart-shaped fruits found in disturbed areas. Only two georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region (one from 1946), but many reports from communities and other areas of significant impact (logging roads/camps) in AKEPIC.
Cardamine angulataSeaside BittercressThis species is a Pacific Northwest Coast endemic known primarily from northern California to Washington. In British Columbia it has been reported only on the far southern coast of Vancouver Island and on Haida Gwaii. So far in Southeast Alaska it has been found near Craig on the southern outer coast.
Cardamine bellidifoliaAlpine BittercressMost collections are from the northern mainland along from alpine or glacier associated areas. The only island collections are from Baranof Island and Chichagof Island. A single collection from the southern mainland, but given the overall range of this species, it probably occurs throughout in suitable habitat.
Cardamine breweriBrewer's BittercressThere are no collections in ARCTOS nor indicated on e-Flora BC of this species from Alasa. However, it was included on the preliminary checklist for Southeast Alaska, as well as in Hall's treatment.
Cardamine nymaniiNorthern Field BittercressFormerly C. pratensis ssp angustifolia. There are no collections in ARCTOS (as C. p. angustifolia) from near Southeast Alaska (with many from more northern and western regions). E-flora BC maps have a few records from northern BC, the nearest to our region being at southern Atlin Lake. There are collections of Cuckoo Flower (Cardamine pratensis) - which FNA doesn't indicate occurs in Alaska - from near Yakutat and just across the border from Haines - but the subspecies was not indicated.
Cardamine occidentalisWestern BittercressAlthough Alaska is included in the range of this species in the FNA treatment and it was also included in the preliminary checklist, there are no collections of this species in ARCTOS, nor any indicated on the e-Flora BC maps from anywhere near the region. This a plant later identified as this species was photographed (but not turned into a permanent collection) along the former upper Blue Lake mud flat.
Cardamine oligospermaLittle Western BittercressIt is unclear whether this species occurs in the region. The range given in FNA includes British Columbia, but not Alaska. Hall's treatment suggests she is referring to the former kamtschatica variety, now known as Umbel Bittercress (Cardamine umbellata) in FNA treatment. Collection records in ARCTOS that show up in a search for this species all are currently identified as C. umbellata. However, e-Flora BC map includes records from through out the province (though it apperas C. umbellata is maintained as C. o. kamtschatica in those records).
Cardamine pensylvanicaPennsylvania BittercressAbundance is unclear. Only two collections in ARCTOS - both from southern mainland (as C. pennsylvanica).
Cardamine pratensisCuckoo FlowerRange in FNA treatment indicates this species is primarily from the northeast part of North America though it is also found in British Columbia in the west (though stated range does not include Alaska). FNA also suggests most (if not all) populations of this species are introduced from Europe. Alaska records may be of a former subspecies that is now called Northern Field Bittercress (Cardamine nymanii). ARCTOS has collections (not identified to subspecies) from near Yakutat (including one just across the border in Yukon Territory).
Cardamine umbellataUmbel BittercressMany collections from throughout the region.
Cochlearia groenlandicaScurvygrassOnly eight collection in ARCTOS, one from Sitka sound, the others from the north end of Prince of Wales Island and nearby associated islands. Probably occurs throughout the region in rocky coastal habitats.
Descurainia incanaMountain TansymustardNo collections of this species in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, but e-Flora BC has one mapped at Whitepass along the border. Given the overall distribution of this species, if it occurs in the region, it is probably only at the extreme northeast margins.
Descurainia pinnataWestern tansey mustardThere appear to be no records from Alaska of this species. FNA does not include Alaska in the range of any of the subspecies. This species does occur in British Columbia and up to Whitehorse, but there do not appear to be any collections from near the border, and it seems unlikely this species occurs within the region.
Descurainia sophiaHerb sophiaAlthough it is implied to have been found in the region on the Preliminary checklist, there are no collection records in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, nor does the e-Flora BC map include any records from nearby (though it has been found in northern BC). AKEPIC does not have any records in its database either. It seems unlikely that this species is currently established in Southeast Alaska.
Descurainia sophioidesNorthern Tansy MustardA single 2002 collection from near White Pass. Collection records would imply this is near the southern limit of the normal species.
Draba aureaGolden RockcressThe overall collection record of this species (from ARCTOS and e-Flora BC) suggest the range of this species is primarily on the inland side of the coast mountains as well as into the rocky mountains. There are not any collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska of this species (though there are 4 records that show up in a search, but all are currently identified as Northern rockcress (Draba borealis)).
Draba borealisNorthern rockcressA handful of collections from the region are in ARCTOS, with most near the northern border, but one from Coronation Island as well.
Draba canaCushion DrabaA single collection from mountains north of Glacier Bay and west of Haines is the only record from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS.
Draba cinereaGray-leaved DrabaA single collection in ARCTOS from the mountains north Glacier Bay and west of Haines. This appears to be at the southern edge of its range.
Draba corymbosaFlat-top DrabaD. eschscholtzii was included in the preliminary checklist, though it seems this name may be misapplied to plants in North America (see discussion at pan arctic flora site). It is not entirely clear what the best alternative may be, however D. corymbosa seems plausible. In any case, there appear to be no documented collections of this species from the region at present, though there are three records from the Haines triangle region of British Columbia included in maps on e-Flora BC.
Draba crassifoliaSnowbed DrabaFour collections in ARCTOS, all from mountains on the mainland, three from Juneau north, and one from the Cleveland Peninsula.
Draba glabellaRock Whitlow-grassThis species has been collected from White Pass near Skagway, Greens Creek area on Admiralty Island, and from above Rust Lake on Chichagof Island. The latter appear to the the southernmost records of this species in western North America.
Draba grandisNorth Pacific RockcressOnly four collections georeferenced in ARCTOS, all from the outer coast (does it occur along shorelines of inside waters)?
Draba incertaYellowstone DrabaOverall range of this species appears to favor the east side of the coast range, but there are two collections of this species in ARCTOS from northern Prince of Wales Island.
Draba juvenilisLong-stalked DrabaThree collections from the region in ARCTOS, two on limestone areas of Chichagof Island, and one from the Juneau Icefield. Southeast Alaska is at the southern margin of the overall range of this species.
Draba lonchocarpaLance-pod drabaA dozen collections from the region in ARCTOS, most from the northeastern mainland, but also from Baranof Island, Hecata Island, and Prince of Wales Island, and one collection from the south central mainland. Habitat in Southeast Alaska appears to be limited to the alpine.
Draba nemorosaWoodland DrabaNo collections from the region. The nearest reports appear to be from the interior beyond the coast mountain range. It seems unlikely this species occurs in Southeast Alaska.
Draba nivalisSnow drabaAlthough it was included on the preliminary checklist, there are no records of this species from the region that are georeferenced in ARCTOS, nor any that show up on e-Flora BC map. The overall range of this species is almost entirely north and/or west of Southeast Alaska.
Draba oligospermaFew-seeded drabaThere are not collections indicated in ARCTOS, nor on e-flora BC maps from the region. Overall range of this species appears to be primarily in the Rocky Mountains, with the nearest collections to Southeast Alaska in the southern Yukon Territories. It seems unlikely this species occurs in our region.
Draba praealtaTall Whitlow-grassA single collection in ARCTOS from Takhin Ridge in the mountains between Glacier Bay and Haines. FNA author doesn't consider this species well-substantiated in the Alaska.
Draba ruaxesRainier drabaThere appear to be no collections from Southeast Alaska, but there is one from Yukon Territory right along the border north of Yakutat.
Draba stenolobaAlaska drabaSeveral collections in ARCTOS from the region, with most from the area north of Lynn Canal. Additional collections on the mainland from the area north of Yakutat and one from the mainland east of Wrangell suggest this species may show up at least occasionally in the coast mountains of the mainland throughout. A single collection from Admiralty Island is the only island record in the region.
Erysimum cheiranthoidesWormseedOverall distribution of this species is unclear. There are a handful of collections, mostly from northern Lynn Canal, but also one from Chichagof Island at/near Todd Cannery site. Oldest collection is from Haines in 1949. Also present in Sitka. Although FNA indicates this is an introduced species it does not seem to be tracked in AKEPIC database.
Erysimum inconspicuumShy WallflowerThere do not appear to be any collections from the region. The distribution of this species seems to indicate a preference for a more continental climate, and is perhaps unlikely to occur in Southeast Alaska.
Hesperis matronalisSweet-rocketFew actual collections, but there are reports from several communities in the AKEPIC database. This species is not infrequently grown as an ornamental plant, and it may be that many of the observations are from intentional plantings.
Lepidium densiflorumCommon PepperweedAlthough included on the preliminary checklist and in Hall's treatment, there are no collections in ARCTOS, nor a reports of this species in the AKEPIC database.
Lepidium virginicumWild PeppergrassAlthough included in the preliminary checklist, there are no collections in ARCTOS, nor any in the AKEPIC database, so it seems unlikely that this species is currently present in the region.
Parrya nudicaulisNakedstem WallflowerAlthough included in Hall's treatment, there are not any records from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS, and the overall distribution of collections of this species would suggest it's unlikely to occur in Southeast Alaska except possibly at the northern margins.
Physaria arcticaArctic BladderpodNo collections or reports from Southeast Alaska, but there are two records on e-Flora BC maps from the Tatshenshini River in the Haines triangle of British Columbia. If this species occurs in the region, it is probably only at the margins.
Raphanus sativusGarden RadishNo collection records from the region in ARCTOS. Nor any reports in AKEPIC database. A plant thought to be this species has been seen at Pirate's Cove near Sitka.
Rorippa curvipesBluntleaf YellowcressAlthough listed in the preliminary checklist, the FNA does not consider this species to occur in Alaska, and there are no collections especially near to Southeast Alaska. It appears that it's primary range probably goes as far north as the southern half of British Columbia.
Rorippa curvisiliquaWestern YellowcressOnly two collections from Southeast Alaska, one at Hyder and another at Glacier Bay. Also a collection along the Haines Highway on the BC side of the border.
Rorippa palustrisMarsh YellowcressMore than a dozen collections scattered throughout the region. Presumed to occur throughout, though none are
Sinapis albaCharlock MustardA single record in AKEPIC from the Klawock Airport in 2004. Reported to have 50% canopy cover in a .1 acre area, it was also noted that species was uncertain.
Sinapis arvensisCharlockAlthough included on the preliminary checklist, there appears to be no collection records of this species from the region, nor any records from AKEPIC.
Sisymbrium altissimumTall Tumble MustardCollections in ARCTOS from Juneau, Haines, and Skagway. None are georeferenced, all from prior to 1940. Only a single recent report from Klukwan in 2007 from AKEPIC database. This species may not be established in the region.
Sisymbrium officinaleHedge MustardA 2009 collection from Hoonah is the only recent one in ARCTOS (though there may be others from the early 1900s). Only one recent report in AKEPIC, from Prince of Wales Island. AKEPIC also reports a 1916 citation from Anderson of this species occurring in Sitka. It is unclear whether this species is currently established in the region.
Subularia aquaticaAwlwortOnly four collections in ARCTOS, one from near Ketchikan, another from the Stikine River, one on Kruzof Island near Sitka, and last near Yakutat.
Thlaspi arvenseField PennycressFour collections in ARCTOS, from Juneau, near Haines, and Skagway. An additional (2006) record from Kake and three (2007) from Haines in AKEPIC. Seems likely to be established in the Haines area, elsewhere is unclear.
Turritis glabraTower RockcressSeveral old collections in ARCTOS from Haines area, and one 1941 collection from Kake. AKEPIC includes several reports from Haines area cites one historical collection (1929) from Sitka. Given the records, it seems like this species is established in the Haines area, but perhaps not elsewhere.

Cabombaceae ( 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Brasenia schreberiWatershieldAquatic perennial herb with oval to elliptic floating leaves and purplish solitary flowers Only collected from Gravina Island and Duke Island in the extreme southern part of the region. Apparently nearest other reports are from southern British Columbia.

Callitrichaceae (Water-starwort: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Callitriche hermaphroditicaNorthern Water-starwortA single collection from near Disenchantment Bay outside of Yakutat is the only record from the region.
Callitriche heterophyllaTwo-headed Water-starwortFour collections from the southern half of the region. Overall distribution of this species suggests it should be expected throughout. It is unclear whether this species is mostly overlooked (uncollected), or relatively uncommon with only scattered occurrences.
Callitriche palustrisSpring Water-starwortProbably occurs throughout. Several collections from throughout much of the region. Apparently no collections from southern outer islands, nor northern Lynn Canal.

Campanulaceae (Harebell: 5 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Campanula lasiocarpaMountain HarebellUncommon plant of subalpine meadows extending to above the treeline. All but two georeferenced collections of this species come from the northern mainland, including the mountains around Lynn Canal from Juneau north, and the mountains in the vicinity of Yakutat. Island records from northern Admiralty and from Baranof Island. There appear to be few collection records from coastal areas south of the region. It is unclear whether this species occurs (or should be expected) in the southern part of the region.
Campanula rotundifoliaCommon HarebellCommon blue-flowered herb of open areas including beaches, river banks, meadows, and cliffs. Many collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Campanula scouleriScouler's HarebellApparently no collections from the region. E-flora BC map shows no collections north of southern-most coastal British Columbia. It is included in both the preliminary checklist and in Hall's 2010 treatment, but actual distribution (or even presence) in the region probably needs further documentation.
Campanula unifloraArctic HarebellOnly two collections of this species in ARCTOS, both from Admiralty Island near the Greens Creek Mine. Primary range appears to be more from arctic/alpine tundra (including much of Alaska, but also the Rocky Mountains).
Lobelia dortmannaWater LobeliaOnly two collections, both from the very southern end of the region. These are the furthest north of this species on the west coast of North America.

Caprifoliaceae (Honeysuckle: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Linnaea borealisTwinflowerInconspicuous trailing perennial common in scrubby forests and muskeg edges. Many collections from throughout much of the region. Probably fairly common throughout in appropriate habitat.
Lonicera involucrataBearberry honeysuckleAlthough reported to occur in the northern part of the region, all the collections are from the middle of Prince of Wales Island south.
Symphoricarpos albusSnowberryFour georeferenced collections in ARCTOS, all from the vicinity of Haines. Introduced as an ornamental in some communities.

Caryophyllaceae (Pink: 39 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Agrostemma githagoCommon CorncockleAlthough the preliminary checklist includes this species as introduced in the Sitka area, there are no records in ARCTOS, nor any reports in AKEPIC. It is not considered established in British Columbia. It seems unlikely to be established in Southeast Alaska.
Cerastium arvenseField ChickweedCollections primarily from the vicinity of upper Lynn Canal. However, a handful of collections from outer islands, Baranof, northern Prince of Wales, and Coronation.
Cerastium beeringianumBering ChickweedSeveral collections from the northern Lynn Canal and Gulf Coast, but also some from the southern part of the region, including on islands. (However, not all of those appear to have been verified, and that may be advisable given the difficulty of this genus.)
Cerastium fischerianumFischer's ChickweedA single (non-georeferenced) collection from Juneau vicinity is the only one in Arctos from the region. Overall distribution of this species in Norther America appears to be primarily from Kodiak Island westward. There are a couple of BC records from Haida Gwaii and Vancouver Island, so this species could be expected to occur at least occasionally, probably mostly in alpine habitats.
Cerastium fontanumBig ChickweedIntroduced species that appears to be widespread throughout the region in disturbed areas (including logging roads) with collections in ARCTOS and additional records in AKEPIC.
Cerastium glomeratumMouse-ear ChickweedDistribution in the region is somewhat unclear. Only a small number of collections and/or reports. Most introduced weedy species appear to be Big Chickweed (Cerastium fontanum) rather than this species (based on collection records).
Honckenya peploidesBeach GreensCommon plant of the upper beach on rocky shores. Collections from throughout the region, with the primary gap being much of the southern outer islands.
Minuartia bifloraMountain SandwortFour collection records in ARCTOS - three from the northern mainland (vicinity of Lynn Canal) and one from Prince of Wales Island. All collections from alpine areas.
Minuartia macrocarpaLarge-fruited SandwortA single collection from the Taiya River outside of Skagway. This appears to be one of the (south) eastern-most records in North America.
Minuartia obtusilobaAlpine sandwortIncluded in the preliminary checklist. It is not clear if there are any collections from the region, though there are several from very close to it along the northern margins. There may need to be some review of this species and Mountain Sandwort (Minuartia biflora)
Minuartia rossiiRoss's sandwortAlthough included on the preliminary checklist, there are no documented collections of this species from the region in ARCTOS, nor any indicated from British Columbia (it is not included in e-Flora BC). The nearest collections appear to be room the Yukon and Wrangell-St. Elias area of the main part of Alaska.
Minuartia rubellaReddish sandwortSeveral collections from the region. Distribution of collections suggest this species probably occurs throughout much of the region, though perhaps in limited and/or under sampled habitats.
Minuartia strictaRock sandwortAlthough reported on the preliminary checklist, there do not appear to be any collections from the region.
Moehringia laterifloraBlunt-leaved SandwortQuite a few collections from the northern part of the region. Based on collection records, this species would seem to be non-coastal in western North America south of where it occurs in Southeast Alaska (north and west of the region it has frequently been collected in coastal areas). Southern-most collections in the region are from norther Chichagof Island, but it has also been found on northern Kruzof Island.
Sagina maximaBeach PearlwortCommon small herb of the splash zone along rocky shorelines. Probably occurs throughout, though collections are primarily from the southern half of the region (with one from the Yakutat area as well).
Sagina nivalisSnow PearlwortA few collections from the northern mainland, including the gulf coast, Glacier Bay, and White Pass. A collection from British Columbia near Hyder suggests this species may occur in the coastal mountains elsewhere in the region as well.
Sagina procumbensBird's Eye PearlwortIntroduced species with only three collections in ARCTOS (including one from 1939). Many reports, primarily from near Sitka and the eastern half of Chichagof Islands, in AKEPIC database.
Sagina saginoidesArctic PearlwortSeveral collections from the northern mainland. There are records from Haida Gwaii, so perhaps this species may be found on islands in Southeast Alaska at some point.
Silene acaulisMoss CampionCollections scattered throughout much of the region. Apparently no (recent, georeferenced) collections from several of the major islands, including Admiralty, Baranof, and Chichagof.
Silene involucrataArctic catchfllyApparently no recent (georeferenced) collections from the region. There may be older collections in ARCTOS that have not been georeferenced. ssp. involucrata seems to be the expected one for this region.
Silene menziesiiMenzies' CampionNo recent (georeferenced) collections from Southeast Alaska. Two older collections from from Skagway (1934) and Juneau (1925).
Silene noctifloraNight-flowering CatchflyThere seem to be no recent reports. Reported by Anderson in 1918 publication on plant of Southeast Alaska.
Silene soczavanaBoreal CatchflyCollections from Baranof Island and Dall Island. Taxonomy of this species and the related Apetalous Catchfly (Silene uralensis) may not yet be settled.
Silene uralensisApetalous CatchflyCollections from West Chichagof, Northern Admiralty Island, and northern Prince of Wales Island. See also Boreal Catchfly (Silene soczavana) (some of the collections for S. uralensis may need to be reviewed to see if they are S. soczavana)
Spergula arvensisCorn SpurryOnly two collections in ARCTOS (from Ketchikan and Haines), but many reports in AKEPIC database from Juneau and Haines areas.
Spergularia canadensisCanada Sand-spurryCollections from across the region (though apparently none from Baranof Island, where it does occur).
Spergularia rubraRed SandspurryA single collection from Haines in ARCTOS. Several reports in AKEPIC database from the Haines area as well as Juneau.
Stellaria alaskanaAlaska StarwortIncluded in the preliminary checklist and Hall's 2010 treatment, but there are no collection records from the region in ARCTOS. This species is not known to occur in British Columbia, so additional documentation of its occurrence in Southeast Alaska may be warranted.
Stellaria borealisBoreal StarwortCollections from throughout the region with both subspecies (borealis and sitchana) represented.
Stellaria calycanthaNorthern StarwortSeveral collections scattered throughout the region with some gaps (no collections from the northern islands, for example). Presumably occurs throughout, though perhaps not as commonly as Boreal Starwort (Stellaria borealis), which was formerly considered a subspecies of this.
Stellaria crassifoliaFleshy StarwortApparently one collection of this species from the region at the Stikine River mouth. Overall distribution of collections tends towards more inland and/or northerly locations, so its occurrence in Southeast Alaska may be marginal.
Stellaria crispaCurled StarwortScattered collections throughout the region, but with gaps. Apparently no collections from Chichagof Island, Admiralty Island, nor the southern outer islands.
Stellaria humifusaSaltmarsh StarwortCollections from throughout the region.
Stellaria longifoliaLong-leaved StarwortOnly a handful of collections from the region identified as this species in ARCTOS. All are from the northern part.
Stellaria longipesLong-stalked StarwortCollections from the northern half of the region. Conspicuously absent in the southern part. Although collected many times from interior British Columbia, there is only a single (1914) collection from the coastal areas north of Vancouver Island.
Stellaria mediaCommon ChickweedOnly a few collections in ARCTOS, but may reports from throughout the region in AKEPIC database. It is unclear to what extent this species is present away from regular human disturbance.
Stellaria ruscifoliaPrickly-leaved StarwortIncluded in the preliminary checklist as well as Hall's 2010, the FNA treatment for this species shows Southeast Alaska included in the distribution of this species. However, there are no collections in ARCTOS of this species from Southeast Alaska.
Vaccaria hispanicaCow SoapwortOnly two records, both old, from the region. A 1929 collection in ARCTOS frm Juneau, and a citation (found in AKEPIC database) of a 1916 publication by Anderson indicating it had been found in Sitka. Probably no longer occurs in the region.
Wilhelmsia physodesMerckiaIncluded in the Preliminary checklist and in Hall's 2010 treatment, but there are no records from British Columbia, nor are there any georeferenced records from Southeast Alaska. (There are a quite a few records in ARCTOS without any geolocation data, and it is possible that an older collection or two from Southeast Alaska is among them.) The nearest collection records appear to be from well into the Yukon Territory or near Prince William Sound.

Chenopodiaceae (Goosefoot: 7 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Atriplex gmeliniiGmelin's SaltbrushOn beaches, Locally abundant to absent. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout much of the region.
Atriplex patulaSpearscaleIt appears there may be some confusion between this species and Gmelin's Saltbrush (Atriplex gmelinii). Based on the FNA account, it would seem this species should not be expected in salt rich areas (i.e., beaches) while A. gmelinii is restricted to such locations. There are a few collections in ARCTOS identified as this species (though all of those are from beach habitats, and maybe have been named with a broader understanding of A. patula than used in FNA) and two reports in AKEPIC (though those appear to be on shorelines, so may need reconsideration).
Chenopodium albumLamb's QuartersAlthough there are reports in the AKEPIC database from a few places around the region, the only collections in ARCTOS are from the north end of Lynn Canal (Haines and Skagway). This species is similar to Gmelin's Saltbrush (Atriplex gmelinii), so it would be nice to verify observations reported from the beach habitats of that species.
Chenopodium capitatumStrawberry spinachAnnual weedy herb with slightly fleshy arrow-shaped leaves and dense red clusters of fruit. A single (georeferenced) collection in ARCTOS from Andrew Island in the Stikine River. Apparently not included in AKEPIC.
Salicornia depressaBeach AsparagusThere are several collections that resolve to this species in ARCTOS, however at least some of those may actually be Beach Asparagus (Sarcocornia perennis).

FNA distribution map has this species occurring throughout coastal BC and again on the east side of Cook Inlet, but absent in Southeast Alaska.

It seems like this species does occur in the region, but more investigation is need to clearly resolve the question.
Sarcocornia perennisBeach AsparagusOnly one collection identified as this species in ARCTOS, though more as Salicornia virginica, which presumably are of this species. Taxonomy of this group is apparently a little confusing. FNA has 'all Salicornia spp as annuals, with Sarcocornia spp being perennial.
Suaeda calceoliformisSea bliteOnly one collection in ARCTOS identified as this species. Additional collections identified as S. maritima may also be this species, as the FNA treatment indicates that species is not known from the Pacific Coast of North America. Given the relatively few collections from the region as well from coastal BC, this species is probably not common in Southeast Alaska.

Clusiaceae (Mangosteen: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Hypericum perforatumCommon St. John's-wortReported mostly from the southern half of the region, but also in Hoonah. A few collections in ARCTOS, with many additional records in the AKEPIC database.

Cornaceae (Dogwood: 4 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Cornus canadensisBunchberryCommon in forests, forest edges, and some open areas. There are many collections in ARCTOS identified as this species. However, strictly speaking, it may be that at least some of the are Western Cordilleran Bunchberry (Cornus unalaschkensis), the hybrid between this species and Bog Bunchberry (Cornus suecica). In the Sitka area, it seems there are very few plants with flower petals that do not have purple on them to at least a certain extent, and it may be similar in other parts of the region.
Cornus sericeaRed-osier DogwoodCollections in ARCTOS from throughout much of the region away from the outer coast. There are no collections from the gulf coast, nor the west side of the outer islands. (One partial exception is a collection from the north half of Prince of Wales Island.)
Cornus suecicaBog BunchberryFairly Common perennial herb in muskegs.

Several collections scattered from throughout the region identified as this species in ARCTOS (also some additional ones identified as intermediate between this species and Cornus canadensis).

Apparently Southeast Alaska is near the southern limit of this species in western North America, as there appears to be only a single collection from coastal British Columbia (where it is a listed species).
Cornus unalaschkensisWestern Cordilleran BunchberryProbably Fairly Common. Collections from through out much of the region (including some identified as hybrids between this species and Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)).

Crassulaceae (Stonecrop: 5 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Crassula aquaticaWater PygmyweedSo far known only a collection at Chief Shakes Hotsprings along the Stikine River
Rhodiola integrifoliaLedge StonecropPresumably found throughout the region. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout much of Southeast, though with the exception of a collection from southwest Chichagof Island, there is a gap between the southern half of the region and south of Juneau.
Sedum divergensPacific StonecropSoutheast Alaska appears to be near the northern extent of the range of this species. Collections from near Haines (two at mile 10 of Haines highway from 1967 and 1981) and one from Takhin Ridge (2000). Other nearby collections include from near Disentchantment Bay, and from across the border near the Stikine River.
Sedum lanceolatumSpear-leaved StonecropThere appear to be no collections from the region in ARCTOS. The overall range of this species appears to be primarily continental, and there are collections from just across the border along the northern mainland.
Sedum oreganumOregon StonecropCollected from Baranof Lake (1963, still present in 2011), with an additional collection on the Canadian side of the border along the highway out of Haines. In 2012 a population was found on rocks above high tide at Whitewater Bay on Admiralty Island (E. Anderson via K. LaBounty). Additional records from near Haines (date unknown), two on Southern Admiralty (listed as 1937 and 1942), and Hyder (1940) are shown on the species occurrence map at AKNHP. (The latter three may be 3 collections in ARCTOS that have not been georeferenced.)

Diapensiaceae ( 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Diapensia obovataDiapensiaNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS (though there are quite a few collections not georeferenced, and it may be that one or more of those is from Southeast Alaska). I single point on the e-Flora BC map for a collection from Lynn Canal.

Droseraceae (Sundew: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Drosera anglicaLong-leaf SundewSmall, insectivorous perennial infrequently found in bogs and meadows. Collections span the region, though most are in the southern half on the inside and mainland.
Drosera rotundifoliaRound-leaf SundewCommon, but easily overlooked insectivorous perennial of muskegs Collections from throughout the region.
Drosera x obovataSundew HybridThis hybrid between Round-leaf Sundew (Drosera rotundifolia) and Long-leaf Sundew (Drosera anglica) has been reported to occur in Southeast Alaska, though there appear to be no collections in ARCTOS.

Elaeagnaceae (Oleaster: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Shepherdia canadensisSoapberrySeveral collections in ARCTOS, though all are from the northern mainland part of the region (but not the gulf coast).

Ericaceae (Heather: 35 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Andromeda polifoliaBog RosemaryBog Rosemary is a small easily overlooked evergreen perennial found in bogs. Plants typically consist of a few slender stems, so are most noticeable when the pink urn-shaped flowers are blooming. Like many bog plants, the leaves contain a variety of toxins and should not be consumed . Scattered collections (15 georeferenced) from across the region. Probably under collected relative to its abundance.
Arctostaphylos uva-ursiKinnikinnickA few scattered collections in ARCTOS, mostly from the northern mainland, but also near Hyder, on eastern Baranof Island, and from Coronation Island. (There may be additional records that have not been georeferenced).
Arctous alpinusAlpine BearberryIncluded in Hall's 2010 treatment, but apparently no records from Southeast Alaska (or anywhere close) in ARCTOS. However, Hall does not include Red-fruit Bearberry (Arctous rubra), which has been collected from the region. (A. rubra appears to formerly have been considered a subspecies of this species.)
Arctous rubraRed-fruit BearberryOnly a handful of georeferenced collections from the region in ARCTOS (there are many records without georeferencing, and some may be from the region). Collections from the northern mainland, as well as Prince of Wales and Chichagof Island.
Cassiope lycopodioidesClub-moss Mountain-heatherProbably uncommon small evergreen trailing shrub. Several collections in ARCTOS, but most from the northern mainland near Juneau with three more from the southern mainland and Revillagigedo Island.
Cassiope mertensianaWhite Mountain HeatherCommon mat-forming evergreen heather found in the low alpine near and above treeline. Over 30 collections in ARCTOS, most from the mainland (excluding the northern gulf coast) and inner islands. Also collected on Baranof Island and a single collection in the St. Elias mountains near the border along the Alsek River.
Cassiope tetragonaWhite Arctic Mountain HeatherSeveral collections in ARCTOS from the northern mainland (mostly either north or east of Lynn Canal).
Chimaphila umbellataPipsissewaCollections in ARCTOS primarily from the vicinity of Haines, but also collections from Beardsley Islands in Glacier Bay, Gull Island in Lynn Canal, along the Taku River, and near Hyder.
Elliottia pyrolifloraCopperbushDeciduous shrub with glossy,yellow green leaves and showy copper-colored flowers common near treeline, uncommon at lower elevations. Collections from throughout the region.
Empetrum nigrumCrowberryCommon evergreen shrub with needle shaped leaves found in muskegs and open subalpine areas at or just above treeline and on rocks at the shore line. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Gaultheria shallonSalalSeveral collections in ARCTOS, most at or south of a line from Etolin Island to Coronation Island. Two collections from Baranof Island in the vicinity of Goddard Hot Springs.
Harrimanella stellerianaAlaska Mountain HeatherSmall evergreen shrub common in subalpine to lower alpine meadows and heath, less common in lower elevation muskeg and open forest. Collections from throughout the region, though there are gaps including Chichagof Island and Admiralty Island.
Kalmia microphyllaBog LaurelCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region, but under Kalmia polifolia (which, as of June 2016, has apparently not been considered a synonym of K. microphylla in the ARCTOS taxonomy).
Kalmia procumbensAlpine AzaleaAlso known as Loiseleuria procumbens in many references Collections in ARCTOS from across the region.
Menziesia ferrugineaRusty MenziesiaCollections in ARCTOS span the region, but there are gaps (such as Chichagof Island and Admiralty Island) where this species certainly occurs.
Moneses unifloraSingle DelightCollections in ARCTOS from across the region.
Monotropa hypopitysAmerican PinesapUncommon to Fairly Common species of forested areas from low to middle elevations. Abundance seems to vary by year. Scattered collections mostly from the eastern mainland and inner islands, but also from Baranof and Chichagof Islands.
Monotropa unifloraIndian-pipeA single collection (Hyder, 1939) in ARCTOS. Collections from BC near Southeast Alaska are east of the coast range, while coastal collections are no further north than the southern half of Vancouver Island.
Orthilia secundaOne-sided WintergreenA good number of collections in ARCTOS, but mostly from the northern half of the region. Also a few from the southern mainland. It is unclear whether this is due to the distribution of the species, or uneven collecting efforts.
Phyllodoce empetriformisPink Mountain-heatherFew collections from the region in ARCTOS or on e-Flora BC map, all from near the northern border with British Columbia outside of Haines and Skagway. One additional report from Etolin Island. Over all distribution of this species appears to reach its northern and western extent in the southern Yukon Territory, with occurrence in the northern part of its range primarily on the continental side of the coast range.
Phyllodoce glandulifloraYellow Mountain HeatherFairly common needle-leaved small shrub found from low to upper elevations. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Pyrola asarifoliaLiverleaf WintergreenSeveral collections in ARCTOS spanning north to south, but primarily limited to the mainland. Exceptions include two collections from the east side of Chichagof Island and one collection from Mitkof Island.
Pyrola chloranthaGreen-flowered WintergreenApparently only a few collections in ARCTOS identified as this species (though many more identified as Pyrola minor show up in a search for this name). Collections from Chichagof Island, Glacier Bay, and upper Lynn Canal.
Pyrola minorLesser WintergreenARCTOS records indicate scattered collections along the outer coast, quite a few additional collections from the vicinity of Juneau and upper Lynn Canal. A single collection from northern Admiralty Island is the only one on the inner islands. Just two collections from the mainland south of Juneau, both in the vicinity of Hyder.
Rhododendron groenlandicumLabrador TeaSmall evergreen shrub with aromatic leaves and white flowers found in most muskegs. Georeferenced collecctions in ARCTOS primarily from the southern half of the region and in the Juneau vicinity. A few scattered collections elsewhere in the region.
Rhododendron tomentosumNarrow-leaf Labrador teaThis species appears to reach its southern extent (on the east side of its range) in the very northern part of the region. There appear to be very few collections, all from the upper end of Lynn Canal. (A search in ARCTOS includes many collections currently identified as Rhododendron groenlandicum, which may have previously been thought to be this species.)
Therorhodion camtschaticumKamchatka RhododendronOnly three collections in ARCTOS, all from the northwestern part of the region (from Yakobi Island to Yakutat). Additional reports from Mt. Edgecumbe (2009, photo) and northern Chichagof Island (near Elfin Cove). Hall reports this species is present in the mountains above Juneau.
Vaccinium alaskaenseAlaska BlueberryTreated as a synonym of V. ovalifolium in the Flora of North America, there seems to be a distinct difference between the plants thought of as this species and those of V. ovalifolium in the Sitka area, at least. This species tends to bloom later (after leaves are out) have much flowers which are distinctly less elongate, and fruit that is noticably darker (with a different flavor). Further investigations, including some genetic work, are on-going. ARCTOS collection records primarily from the southern half of the region and in the immediate vicinity of Juneau.
Vaccinium cespitosumDwarf BlueberryARCTOS collection records scattered across the region.
Vaccinium membranaceumThinleaf HuckleberryNot reported from Southeast Alaska, though there are collections from British Columbia not far from the border. This species appears to primarily occur in inland locations in the northern part of its range (though it is coastal in southern BC).
Vaccinium ovalifoliumEarly BlueberryCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region, though not as many from outer islands and the gulf coast, and apparently none from Admiralty Island.
Vaccinium oxycoccosBog CranberryCollections in ARCTOS from across the region.
Vaccinium parvifoliumRed HuckleberryFairly common deciduous shrub in much of southeastern Alaska. The berries are enjoyed by both people and other animals. Most collections in ARCTOS from southern half of the region (including Sitka), but also several from Juneau and at least one from Gustavus.
Vaccinium uliginosumBog BlueberryFairly common dwarf deciduous blueberry found in bogs and alpine tundra Collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Vaccinium vitis-idaeaLingonberryA Fairly Common dwarf evergreen shrub found in bogs, open forests and the highest portions of uplift meadows. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.

Fabaceae (Pea: 45 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Astragalus agrestisPurple Milk VetchAlthough included in the preliminary checklist, there do not appear to be any collections from especially near Southeast Alaska. The nearest indicated on e-Flora BC maps are in the vicinity of the alcan highway in southern Yukon.
Astragalus alpinusAlpine Milk-vetchMost (georeferenced) collections in ARCTOS are from the northern mainland. Two collections from Baranof Island (Bear Mountain and Blue Lake), plus one from northern Prince of Wales Island.
Astragalus americanusAmerican MilkvetchProbably does not occur in the region, but collection is shown on the e-Flora BC map from the Stikine River near the border (it may be this is a location such "Stikine River" with a very wide circle, as there are no other records from particularly near the border.)
Astragalus bodiniiBodin's Milk-vetchAlthough included on the preliminary checklist, there do not seem to be any collections from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS, nor is this species reported from British Columbia. Hulten does include part of Southeast Alaska in the presumed range (based on collections, though it is unclear where they may be currently).
Astragalus eucosmusElegant Milk-vetchIncluded on the preliminary checklist as well as in Hall's 2010 treatment, there do not appear to be any collections from particularly close to Southeast Alaska. The overall range of this species appears to be very continental (especially at latitudes encompassing this region).
Astragalus nutzotinensisNutzotin milk-vetchIncluded on the preliminary checklist, but there do not appear to be any collections in ARCTOS nor indicated on the e-Flora BC map from the region. There are several collections from the Haines Triangle of British Columbia, however.
Astragalus robbinsiiHarold's Milk-vetchA few collections (mostly as A. harringtonii) in ARCTOS, from Chichagof Island, Yakutat area, Glacier Bay, and Dall Island.
Astragalus umbellatusTundra milk vetchNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region, there are collections very near the border outside of Haines on the British Columbia side.
Cytisus scopariusScots BroomUnclear to what extent this species has escaped cultivation in Southeast Alaska. Records in AKEPIC primarly from Prince of Wales Island, but also from other southern Southeast Alaskan communities as well as Sitka, Petersburg, and Hoonah.
Hedysarum alpinumAlpine Sweet-vetchSeveral collections in ARCTOS from the northern mainland part of the region.
Hedysarum borealeNorthern Sweet-vetchARCTOS Collections from near Haines and one from the lower Alsek river about 1 mile west of the border.
Lathyrus japonicusBeach PeaSprawling perennial with purple pea flowers found above the tide line on many beaches Collections in ARCTOS from throughout much of the region, but only one (georeferenced) collection from the southern portion, and none from the southern outer islands. (Collections appear to be infrequent through much of BC before becoming common again in coastal Washington and Oregon.)
Lathyrus ochroleucusCream peaA single (not georeferenced) collection from Hyder in ARCTOS (see link below) originally identified as L. venosus (and included in Hulten as such), but later changed to L. ochroleucus. The overall range of this species appears to be well east of the coast range, so it is unclear what to make of the Hyder collection.
Lathyrus palustrisMarsh PeaCollections in ARCTOS throughout from north to south, mostly from the mainland or near by islands. A single collection from Baranof Island.
Lotus corniculatusBird's-foot TrefoilA number of records in AKEPIC, mostly from islands in the vicinity of the Stikine River delta, but also from Prince of Wales. In addition, ARCTOS has a collection from Hoonah.
Lupinus arcticusArctic lupineApparently no collections of this species from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS. Hulten includes a collection record from Juneau and maps the species as occurring in the northeastern part of the region. (It is presumably Hulten's map that led to the inclusion of this species in subsequent treatments.) There are collections from the BC side of the border. If this species occurs it is either overlooked due to similarity to the common Nootka Lupine (Lupinus nootkatensis), or only occurs at the margins of the region.
Lupinus kuscheiYukon LupineCollections in the Haines triangle of BC not far from the border, but so far not known from Southeast Alaska. (If it does occur, it would most likely be along the Alsek River, where it has been found a few miles east of the border.)
Lupinus lepidusPacific lupineIncluded in the preliminary checklist, probably on the basis of a mapped occurrence from the extreme southeastern part of the region included in Hulten's Flora of Alaska. Mapped records from BC all appear to be from very near the southern border, which suggests Hulten's record may have been a mistake.
Lupinus nootkatensisNootka LupineLarge herb with blue pea flowers and roundish deeply lobed leaves found along roadsides, and in estuary and upper elevation meadows. Collections in ARCTOS from around the region.
Lupinus polyphyllusLarge-leaf lupineA few collections in ARCTOS from the southern part of the region, and the very northern part of the region. Many additional reports in AKEPIC database, mostly from the same areas.
Medicago lupulinaBlack MedickFew collections in ARCTOS (though on from 1958 in Sitka). AKEPIC has many reports, mostly from Prince of Wales Island, but also Sitka, Ketchikan, Juneau, and Kake.
Medicago minimaAlfalfaIn AKEPIC database, four 2004 records from Prince of Wales Island. The observer suggested it may have been part of seed mix. Not considered established in British Columbia, it is probably also not established in Southeast Alaska.
Medicago polymorphaBurr CloverApparently no recent records. AKEPIC notes this species was reported in Anderson's 1918 "Plants of southeastern Alaska" as "Common weed in Sitka."
Medicago sativaAlfalfaA single 1926 collection from Juneau in ARCTOS, and two reports from near Klawock (2005, 2006) in AKEPIC. It is unclear whether this species is established is in the region.
Melilotus albaWhite SweetcloverReports in AKEPIC database from Haines, Skagway, Juneau, Hoonah, Kake, the Stikine River area, Prince of Wales, and Metlakatla.
Melilotus officinalisYellow SweetcloverRecords in AKEPIC database from Prince of Wales Island, Petersburg, Juneau, and Haines.
Oxytropis borealisBoreal LocoweedIncluded on the preliminary checklist based on map in Hulten. However, there are no records from the region, with the nearest being just north of the Yukon border. It probably does not occur in Southeast Alaska.
Oxytropis campestrisField LocoweedSmall light yellow flowered legume of gravel bars and rocky areas at upper elevations Collections in ARCTOS from throughout much of the region, though more concentrated along northern mainland.
Oxytropis deflexaNodding LocoweedNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region, though there is an e-Flora BC collection mapped from near the border on Alsek Lake. Hulten has a collection mapped from the border area north of Skagway. Given the overall distribution of this species, it is likelly to occur only at the northern margins of Southeast Alaska, if at all.
Oxytropis huddelsoniiHuddelson's LocoweedApparently no collections from Southeast Alaska, there are several records from the Haines triangle of British Columbia, though non especially near the border.
Oxytropis maydellianaMaydell's LocoweedApparently no collections from the region in ARCTOS, but Hulten indicates a collection from near the border along the Taku River. E-flora BC has a couple of collections mapped from the Haines triangle.
Oxytropis nigrescensBlackish OxytropeApparently no collections from Southeast Alaska, but this species has been found very near the border from nunataks in the Juneau Icefield on the Canadian side.
Oxytropis scammanianaScamman's OxytropeNo collections in ARCTOS from the region, and only a single record mapped on e-Flora BC in British Columbia adjacent to the border with Yukon Territories. Hulten indicates an isolated collection from the area of the Juneau ice field.
Oxytropis splendensShowy LocoweedA single record from the Haines triangle indicated on the e-Flora BC maps is the only one particularly close to Southeast Alaska.
Trifolium aureumField CloverReported in AKEPIC database from Kupreanof and Prince of Wales Islands. One collection from Kupreanof Island in ARCTOS.
Trifolium campestreField CloverReported as being introduced to Juneau (check Hulten?) - no records of this species in AKEPIC. (check T. aureum)
Trifolium dubiumSuckling CloverFour scattered reports in AKEPIC database, one from 1941 in Juneau, others from False Island (1997), Prince of Wales Island (2005), and Kosciusko Island (2007).
Trifolium hybridumAlsike CloverOnly a couple of collections in ARCTOS, but many reports in the AKEPIC database from across most of the region.
Trifolium pratenseRed CloverIntroduced species with many records in AKEPIC from human impacted areas throughout the region.
Trifolium repensWhite CloverIntoduced species with reports in AKEPIC database for throughout the region almost wherever there has been significant human habitation or impact over the past 100 years.
Trifolium wormskioldiiCoast CloverIncluded in the preliminary checklist, Hall's 2010 treatment - presumably both based on a single record Hulten has mapped from what appears to be Annette Island. There are no collections in ARCTOS. E-flora BC has mapped records from Haida Gwaii, which appear to be the nearest reports (other than Hulten) to Southeast Alaska.
Vicia americanaAmerican VetchApparently three collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, two from the mainland (Taku River, and Hyder, not georeferenced), plus one from Coronation Island.
Vicia craccaBird VetchOne collection from Hyder in ARCTOS. A handful of reports in AKEPIC database from Prince of Wales, Hyder, Juneau, and Skagway.
Vicia nigricansGiant VetchCollections in ARCTOS from as far north as Douglas Island (not all of them georeferenced).
Vicia sativaGarden VetchOnly report from early 1900s in Sitka. This species is probably not established in the region.

Fumariaceae ( 0 species)

- Corydalis now moved to Papaveraceae

Gentianaceae (Gentian: 9 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Gentiana douglasianaSwamp GentianCommon small annual herb of low elevation muskegs and wet meadows. Many collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Gentiana glaucaPale GentianCollections in ARCTOS from the northern half of the inside mainland (i.e., east of Glacier Bay). Also a single collection from Admiralty Island.
Gentiana platypetalaBroad-petalled GentianLate blooming herb with striking blue flowers that is common just above treeline and rare at lower elevations. Collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Gentiana prostrataMoss GentianThree collections from the region in ARCTOS, two from Greens Creek area on Admiralty Island, and one from Mt. Roberts in Juneau.
Gentianella amarellaNorthern GentianCollections in ARCTOS primarily the northern mainland at the upper end of Lynn Canal and along the northern gulf coast. Also collections from Chichagof Island, Coronation Island, and Northern Prince of Wales Island.
Gentianella propinquaFour-parted Dwarf GentianCollections in ARCTOS from the northern mainland, Chichagof Island, and Coronation Island.
Gentianella tenellaSlender gentianNo georeferenced records in ARCTOS from the region. Hulten indicates an isolated occurrence in the vicinity of Juneau.
Lomatogonium rotatumMarsh FelwortCollections in ARCTOS from northern Admiralty Island and on either side of Lynn Canal.
Swertia perennisBog SwertiaCollections in ARCTOS mostly from the outer islands and the vicinity of Glacier Bay, but also a few near Juneau.

Geraniaceae (Geranium: 6 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Erodium cicutariumRed-stem Stork-billThis species is considered one with invasive tendencies. Only reported from Juneau, with old collections (from 1920s) and one collection from 2004 in ARCTOS. No other records in AKEPIC.
Geranium bicknelliiBicknell's CranebillA single collection in ARCTOS from Juneau. AKEPIC includes this species in the introduced plants database, though e-Flora BC indicates it is native in British Columbia.
Geranium carolinianumCarolina CranebillA single collection in ARCTOS from Juneau with no recent records. This species is probably not established in Southeast Alaska.
Geranium erianthumNorthern Stork-billFairly Common perennial herb on well-drained meadows from the beach to subalpine. Georeferenced collections in ARCTOS are mostly from the northern mainland, but also from Baranof, Coronation, and Prince of Wales Islands.
Geranium robertianumHerb RobertFew collections in ARCTOS, but reports from several communities in the region in AKEPIC database.
Geranium sanguineumBloody GeraniumTwo collections in ARCTOS (1936 and 1948) from the Pioneer Home Garden in Sitka (where it had apparently been moved from its initial location at Sawmill Cove). No other reports in AKEPIC.

Grossulariaceae (Currant: 7 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Ribes bracteosumStink CurrantCollections from throughout the region, though few on the northern mainland. PacNW endemic
Ribes glandulosumSkunk CurrantThree collections in ARCTOS from 2011 and 2012, two in Taku Inlet, one from the Juneau Icefield. Yakobi Island record reported by Hall does not appear to be in ARCTOS.
Ribes hudsonianumNorthern Black CurrantAlthough a number of Trailing Black Currant (Ribes laxiflorum) collections show up in an ARCTOS search for this taxon, it appears the only collections identified as this species from the region are near Skagway and Hyder.
Ribes lacustrePrickly CurrantCollections in ARCTOS from across much of the region, they they tend to be clustered a bit. Whether this reflects the distribution, or is merely an artifact of effort, is not clear.
Ribes laxiflorumTrailing Black CurrantCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region (though none georeferenced from Chichagof Island, where it no doubt occurs).
Ribes oxyacanthoidesCanada GooseberrySeems unlikely to occur, nearest records are from well inland in British Columbia.
Ribes tristeRed Swamp CurrantTwo Georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from upper Lynn Canal (Takhin Valley, and at Dyea).

Haloragaceae (Water Milfoil: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Myriophyllum alterniflorumAlternate-flowered Water-milfoilAlthough included by Hall in her 2010 treatment, there are no records from Alaska in ARCTOS, and overall range appears well away from Alaska, so this species probably does not occur in the region.
Myriophyllum sibiricumShortspike WatermilfoilOnly four collections in ARCTOS from the region, all from the northern parts, including Chichagof Island, Haines, Juneau, and Glacier Bay (this one not georeferenced).
Myriophyllum verticillatumWhorl-leaf Water-milfoilOnly a handful of collections in ARCTOS, from near Yakutat, Haines (not georeferenced), and the Stikine River mouth.

Hippuridaceae (Mare’s Tail: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Hippuris montanaMountain Mare's-tailInconspicuous species of wet subalpine and lower alpine meadows. Probably Fairly Common. A few scattered collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Hippuris tetraphyllaFour-leaf Mare's-tailOnly four collections in ARCTOS, three from the vicinity of the Stikine River mouth, the other from Chichagof Island.
Hippuris vulgarisCommon Mare's-tailCollections in ARCTOS from scattered throughout the region.

Hydrophyllaceae (Waterleaf: 6 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Nemophila menziesiiBaby Blue EyesNo collections in ARCTOS, and no records from AKEPIC, so this species may not be established in the region.
Phacelia frankliniiFranklin's PhaceliaApparently no geoferenced collections in ARCTOS, but Hulten includes a dot from the vicinity of Skagway in the occurrence map for this species.
Phacelia mollisSoft PhaceliaA single collection in ARCTOS from Haines (1949).
Phacelia sericeaSilky PhaceliaFour collections in ARCTOS, apparently all from near the same location 14 miles up the Haines Highway. No other records within hundreds of miles (with the greater part of this species' distribution much to the south, but a few occurrences north in the Yukon and eastern Alaska.)
Romanzoffia sitchensisSitka Mist-maidenCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Romanzoffia unalaschcensisUnalaska MistmaidenOnly three collections in ARCTOS from the region, all from the outer coast.

Lamiaceae (Mint: 16 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Clinopodium douglasiiYerba BuenaIncluded on the preliminary checklist based on an early report from Juneau. That appears to be the only record of this species in the state.
Dracocephalum parviflorumDragonheadIncluded in the preliminary checklist, but no collections in ARCTOS from anywhere close to Southeast Alaska. This species appears to be distributed primarily well inland.
Galeopsis bifidaSplit-lip Hemp-nettleCollections in ARCTOS and reports in AKEPIC database from multiple communities in the region.
Galeopsis tetrahitBrittle-stem Hemp-nettleA handful of collections in ARCTOS with many records from several communities throughout the region.
Glechoma hederaceaGround-ivyA 1939 collection in ARCTOS from Wrangell, and a report in AKEPIC database from Juneau from 2010.
Lamium albumWhite dead-nettleReports in AKEPIC from Juneau, Skagway, and Gustavus. A collection record from Juneau in ARCTOS.
Lycopus uniflorusNorthern BugleweedSeveral collections from the southern half of the region (Stikine River and Prince of Wales Island south), with a single collection from northern Chichagof Island.
Marrubium vulgareHorehoundA single 1927 collection from Juneau which notes that it was introduced with sheep manure. No further records in AKEPIC, so this species was presumably never established.
Mentha arvensisField MintScattered collections from the mainland (north to south) and the southern islands. No collections from the major central and northern islands.
Mentha spicataSpearmintA single 1979 collection in ARCTOS from Goddard Hot Springs (near Sitka). An old (first half of 1900s) report from Juneau and a 2014 report from northern Prince of Wales Island in AKEPIC.
Mentha x piperitaPeppermintA single early (<1918) report noted in AKEPIC database from Juneau. Probably not established in the region outside of where it has been planted.s
Nepeta catariaCatnipAn early 1900s record from Sitka included in AKEPIC, and a 1989 record from between Skagway and Dyea on the e-Flora BC map are the only records of this species from the region.
Prunella vulgarisSelf-healCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Scutellaria galericulataMarsh SkullcapThere are no georeferenced collections in ARCTOS and none of the collections with media available (as of 5 Dec 2016) were from the region.
Stachys mexicanaCiliate Hedge-nettleFour collections in ARCTOS from the far southern part of the region near the mainland. Those, and another (1893) collection from the Nass River in adjacent BC are apparently the only records north of Vancouver Island.
Stachys palustrisSwamp HedgenettleApparently no records in ARCTOS or indicated on e-Flora BC maps from the region. Unclear why it was included on the preliminary checklist and in Hall's 2010 treatment.

Lentibulariaceae (Bladderwort: 5 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Pinguicula villosaHairy ButterwortOnly four collections in ARCTOS, two from Sitka (1958 and 2004), one from Douglas Island (1962), and one from Revillagigedo Island (1963).
Pinguicula vulgarisCommon Butterwort30+ Collection in ARCTOS from throughout the region (though some gaps - such as no georeferenced collections from Admiralty Island).
Utricularia intermediaFlat-leaf BladderwortA few scattered collections in ARCTOS spanning the region.
Utricularia macrorhizaCommon BladderwortApparently no collections in ARCTOS from the region, though Hulten has marks near Haines and Annette Island.
Utricularia minorLesser BladderwortOnly a few collections, all from the Stikine River south on the mainland or near islands.

Linaceae (Flax: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Linum lewisiiBlue FlaxHall includes L. perenne it in her 2010 treatment (which is otherwise almost exclusively native species). L. lewisii has been considered a subspecies of this Eurasian species, so we presume this is the one she was referring to. In either case, there are no records from Southeast Alaska in ARCTOS.

Malvaceae ( 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Sidalcea hendersoniiHenderson's Checker-mallowA single collection from near Pt. Howard (west of Juneau) in 2003 is apparently the only record of this species north of Vancouver Island in southern BC. Origination status is unknown. Subsequent visits to the site did not turn up additional plants (Kitty LaBounty pers. comm), so it should not be considered established in the region.

Menyanthaceae (Buckbean: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Menyanthes trifoliataBuckbeanCollections in ARCTOS from across the region (though only one after 1993).
Nephrophyllidium crista-galliDeer CabbageCommon ground cover of upper elevation open areas with succulent kidney-shaped leaves. Also found somewhat less abundantly in some lower elevation muskegs. Collections from throughout the region.

Myricaceae (Bayberry: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Myrica galeSweet GaleQuite a few collections in ARCTOS, with all but one in the far southern part of the region, or the mainland (or adjacent small islands) from Juneau north. The only exception is a collection from Kruzof Island, near Sitka.

Myrsinaceae ( 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Lysimachia maritimaSea MilkwortCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Lysimachia thyrsifloraTufted LoosestrifeScattered collections on the mainland, including the Stikine River, Juneau, Haines, Dundas Bay (Glacier Bay NP), and Yakutat. A single collection from Baker Island, a smaller island on the outside of Prince of Wales Island is the exception.
Trientalis europaeaNorthern Star-flowerCollections in ARCTOS from across the region.

Nymphaeaceae (Water Lily: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Nuphar polysepalaYellow Pond-lilyCommon aquatic plant of shallow lake margins and bog ponds with round floating leaves and large showy yellow flowers. A few collections spanning the full region, though significant gaps (presumably due to lack of collecting effort rather than absence).
Nymphaea odorataFragrant WaterlilyKnown from a single pond in Indian River valley. There is evidence to suggest that its presence is due to a planting by E. W. Merrill in the early 1900s.
Nymphaea tetragonaPygmy WaterlilyOnly two collections from the region in ARCTOS, both from the southern portion on islands near the mainland.

Onagraceae (Evening-primrose: 12 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Chamerion angustifoliumFireweedTall, pink flowered perennial commonly found in open locations, including roadsides and beaches. A few (georeferenced) collections scattered across the region.
Chamerion latifoliumRiver BeautyCommon herb of gravel bars and roadsides.

Collections in ARCTOS from across the region.

Northwest NA endemic.
Circaea alpinaEnchanter's NightshadeSmall perennial usually found forming a ground cover in forested wet areas, particularly common in riparian areas. Widely scattered collections from across the full extent of the region.
Epilobium anagallidifoliumAlpine WillowherbCollections in ARCTOS scattered across the region, though apparently none (that are georeferenced) from the northern islands. The taxonomy of this species is unclear - ARCTOS considers Epilobium alpinum a synonym, while The Plant List does not.
Epilobium ciliatumGlandular Willow-herbCollections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Epilobium davuricumNorthern Swamp WillowherbA single collection from the St. Elias mountains between Yakutat Bay and Icy Bay.
Epilobium hornemanniiHornemann's Willow-herbScattered collection in ARCTOS from across the region. Fewer on the outside islands.
Epilobium lactiflorumMilk-flower WillowherbApparently only four collection in ARCTOS considered this species, all from Juneau, Haines, or Skagway.
Epilobium leptocarpumSlenderfruit WillowherbA few collections in ARCTOS from the region, mostly from the northern part of the region.
Epilobium luteumYellow Willow-herbPerennial herb of high elevation meadows, reported from Chichagof Island Several collections in ARCTOS from somewhat scattered locations across the region.
Epilobium palustreSwamp Willow-herbOnly a handful of georeferenced collections from the region in ARCTOS, three from the Yakutat vicinity, one from Glacier Bay, and another from the Stikine River mouth. Non-georeferenced records in ARCTOS included additional collections from Chichagof Island (Idaho Inlet), Skagway, and three from the Juneau vicinity.
Epilobium x treleasianumHybrid Willow-herbThree collections in ARCTOS from the region, including Russel Fjord, Taku Inlet, and Admiralty Island. Also a fourth from adjacent British Columbia near Hyder.

Orobanchaceae (Broomrape: 20 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Boschniakia hookeriVancouver groundconeClosest records mapped in e-Flora BC are from southern Haida Gwaii.
Boschniakia rossicaNorthern Ground-coneFairly Common parasitic plant associated with Sitka alder. Southeast Alaska may represent the southern extent of the range of this species west of the coast range. Collections in ARCTOS throughout much of the region, except the far southern parts. (No collections from further south along the coast in BC are indicated in e-flora BC.)
Castilleja hyperboreaNorthern paintbrushNo collection in ARCTOS from the region. There are several collections from the Haines triangle area of British Columbia, the overall distribution of this species makes it seem unlikely to occur on the coastal side of the coast mountains.
Castilleja miniataGiant Red PaintbrushMany collections from the region in ARCTOS. (Seems to be absent from Sitka Sound and the west side of Baranof Island.)
Castilleja pallidaGreen PaintbrushIncluded in Hall's 2010 treatment, there are apparently no collections in ARCTOS from the region - Hulten has C. caudata from southwestern Yukon Territory north.
Castilleja parvifloraMountain PaintbrushCommon perennial herb with showy magenta bracts found in subalpine and alpine meadows at or above treeline. Collections in ARCTOS mostly from the northern mainland but also some scattered throughout the rest of the region.
Castilleja tenuisHairy Indian PaintbrushReported from Skagway in the first half of the 1900s. No more recent reports of this introduced species - it is presumed to not be established. It is native to British Columbia, but limited to the far southern portion.
Castilleja unalaschcensisAlaska PaintbrushPerennial herb with simple, linear leaves and showy yellow bracts that is common in well drained meadows from sea level to the treeline.

Many collections in ARCTOS, especially from the outer coast and the northern mainland.

Pacific Northwest (southern BC to closest Aleutian Islands) endemic.
Euphrasia mollisSubalpine EyebrightSmall plant which is easy to overlook. It may be more common than currently thought. Several collections in ARCTOS from the northern mainland and outer islands.
Pedicularis capitataCapitate LousewortThree collections in ARCTOS between upper end of Lynn Canal and the Canadian border.
Pedicularis labradoricaLabrador LousewortNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region. Eflora BC has collections indicated from just across the border along the Haines Highway.
Pedicularis lanataWooly LousewortThere are few collections/reports of this species from the region; most (all?) from the southern islands (Dall Island, Revillagigedo Island, and Prince of Wales Island). Given the relatively isolate occurrence of this species on the southern Southeast Alaska islands and Haida Gwaii (as opposed to much more continental distribution in the rest of BC - with the nearest other coastal collection well to the north at the Malaspina forelands), it may be worth investigating whether this coastal population shows genetic evidence of isolation during the last ice age.
Pedicularis langsdorfiiLangsdorf's LousewortNo collections georeferenced in ARCTOS from the region. There are several collections from the Haines Triangle of BC mapped on the e-Flora BC atlas.
Pedicularis macrodontaMuskeg LousewortOnly one collection in ARCTOS of this species. It has been considered a subspecies of Small-flowered Lousewort (Pedicularis parviflora) and it may be that some collections labeled under that name are of this species.
Pedicularis oederiOeder's LousewortScattered (georeferenced) records from across the region in ARCTOS. Additiona collections from the region may be in the non-georeferenced records.
Pedicularis ornithorhynchaDuck's Bill LousewortCollections in ARCTOS are all from the southern inside islands and mainland or Baranof Island. Apparently reaches the northern extent of its range in Southeast Alaska. Pacific Northwest Coast endemic.
Pedicularis parvifloraSmall-flowered LousewortCollections in ARCTOS primarily from the northern half of the region. It appears this species may reach its southernmost extent on the west coast of North America in Southeast Alaska.
Pedicularis sudeticaSudet LousewortCollections in ARCTOS from Juneau area and near Skagway, plus several in the vicinity of Yakutat.
Pedicularis verticillataWhorled LousewortCollections in ARCTOS are mostly from the west side of the outermost islands. There are also collections from near Juneau and Skagway. This species appears to reach its southern extent along the west coast on Haida Gwaii. Possible refugial candidate (with primary population present in the north and recolonizing southward from there)?
Rhinanthus minorRattleboxMost georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the northern half of the region. One collection from Prince of Wales is the only from the south of the Sitka area.

Papaveraceae (Poppy: 7 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Corydalis aureaGolden corydalisOnly two collections in ARCTOS from Southeast Alaska, both from a little north of Haines. Hulten's map indicates records from the vicinity of Skagway as well.
Corydalis paucifloraFew-flowered corydalisA single collection in ARCTOS from the Klondike Highway outside of Skagway. There is at least one collection from just across the border along the Haines Highway mapped on e-Flora BC.
Papaver alboroseumPale PoppyA 1977 collection mapped in eFlora BC from the nunataks on the BC side of the Juneau icefield is the only record from near the region.
Papaver lapponicumLapland PoppyCollection from the Haines triangle in BC. Given the overall distribution of this species, if it occurs, it is probably only at the very margins.
Papaver macouniiMacoun's PoppyNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from the region. The FNA map suggests this species range southeastern boundary sweeps down from southern Yukon territory to the Alaskan coast near Prince William Sound.
Papaver mcconnelliiMcConnell's PoppyThree 2004 collections from Chichagof Island in ARCTOS are the only records of this species in the region. They were collected from areas with limestone and represent significant range extensions.
Papaver radicatumAlpine PoppyA single collection from Baranof Island is all that is georeferenced in ARCTOS under this species.

Additional records from just across the border in British Columbia are indicated on the eFlora BC map.

There is a Bear Mountain (Baranof Island) Papaver collection not identified to species.

See also Papaver mcconnellii

Parnassiaceae ( 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Parnassia fimbriataFringed Grass-of-ParnassusCollections from across the region in ARCTOS, though a gap in the central inside islands and mainland.
Parnassia kotzebueiKotzebue's Grass-of-ParnassusCollections in ARCTOS mostly from the northern mainland, but also Admiralty Island and Baranof Island.
Parnassia palustrisMarsh Grass-of-ParnassusOverall appearance quite similar to Parnassia fimbriata, however P. fimbriata has distinctive fringes on the flowers. Collections in ARCTOS from the vicinity of the Stikine River (and delta, including Mitkof Island), the northern mainland and far northern end of Chichagof Island.

Phrymaceae ( 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Mimulus guttatusYellow Monkey-flowerCommon species with somewhat weedy habits. Favors open areas from sea level to alpine (when sufficient moisture is available). Collections in ARCTOS from across the region (though apparently none from Glacier Bay or upper Lynn Canal).
Mimulus lewisiiPink Monkey-flowerPerennial herb with striking pink flowers. Found on stable gravel bars and mountain rills, until recently known primarily from several watersheds on Baranof Island and near Hyder in Southeast Alaska with a single collection from Admiralty Island. In 2013 it a single plant was found along Rust Lake Creek on Chichagof Island and "hundreds of individuals" were at Lake Stanton(?) near Farragut Bay (per K. Dillman via K. LaBounty). Over half the collections from the region in ARCTOS are from Baranof Island, but there are also collections from Chichagof, Admiralty Island, and the mainland at Taku Inlet, Stanton Lake (central part of mainland), and from the vicinity of Hyder.

Plantaginaceae (Plantain: 21 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Collinsia parvifloraBlue-eyed MaryTwo collections in ARCTOS - both from along the Haines highway.
Digitalis purpureaFoxgloveOnly a handful of collections in ARCTOS. Many reports in AKEPIC database from throughout most of the region (though not Yakutat). Most reports are from communities and adjacent road systems.
Linaria vulgarisButter and EggsMany reports in AKEPIC database, primarily from upper Lynn Canal, but also reported from Juneau, Skagway, and Ketchikan.
Penstemon gormaniiGorman's BeardtoungueNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS. Hulten indicates a collection from the vicinity of White Pass (though it's unclear which side of the border it is on). The overall range of this species appears to generally be north of the region.
Penstemon procerusLittle-flower PenstemonA 1948 collection from Haines is the only one in ARCTOS of this species from the region.
Penstemon serrulatusSerrulate PenstemonOn georeferenced collection in ARCTOS from near Hyder (though in BC). Location information for other collections not available through website.
Plantago eriopodaSaline PlantainCollections from Yukon and far northern BC. All seem to be well inland, so this species is probably unlikely to occur in the region.
Plantago lanceolataNarrowleaf PlantainCollection in ARCTOS from Hyder and Hanus Bay (Baranof Island), with additional AKEPIC reports from Prince of Wales (a single report) and Juneau (two reports)
Plantago macrocarpaAlaska PlantainCollections in ARCTOS from across the region.
Plantago majorCommon PlantainCollections in ARCTOS from as early as 1939. Reports in AKEPIC database from across the region in areas that have been subject to development.
Plantago maritimaGoosetongueMany collections in ARCTOS from throughout the region.
Veronica americanaAmerican SpeedwellCollections in ARCTOS from across the region.
Veronica anagallis-aquaticaWater SpeedwellNo georeferenced collections in ARCTOS. A single point from Hydaburg in the AKEPIC database refers to a 1968 report from Hulten. This appears to be the only record of this species in the region.
Veronica arvensisCorn SpeedwellA 1983 collection in ARCTOS from Craig and Anderson's 1918 publication (referenced in AKEPIC) appear to be the only published reports from the region.
Veronica chamaedrysGermander SpeedwellAn old (pre-1950) report from Sitka by Hulten (in AKEPIC database) as well as collections from Ketchikan (1979), and Juneau area (2012) in ARCTOS.
Veronica officinalisCommon SpeedwellAKEPIC database has a number of reports from the Ketchikan road system, and another from Kake. ARCTOS has a collection from near Hoonah, and the species has also been reported from Sitka.
Veronica peregrinaNeckweedAKEPIC databse includes an old report from Skagway by Anderson (1920). No (georeferenced) collections in ARCTOS. Hulten's map includes records at Juneau and Ketchikan as well.
Veronica persicaBirdeye SpeedwellNo (georeferenced) collections in ARCTOS. Anderson (1918) reported this species in Juneau (referenced in AKEPIC database).
Veronica scutellataSkullcap SpeedwellNo collections in ARCTOS from the region. Nearest collections indicated on eFlora BC map are one from Haida Gwaii and a few others well inland in Yukon Territory.
Veronica serpyllifoliaThyme-leaf SpeedwellA few georeferenced collections in ARCTOS from across the region (though there are big gaps).
Veronica wormskjoldiiAlpine SpeedwellCollections in ARCTOS from across much of the region, though more from the mainland than islands.

Plumbaginaceae ( 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Armeria maritimaSea thriftHulten indicates a collection from the vicinity of Juneau. There are no georeferenced collections of this species from the region in ARCTOS.

Polemoniaceae (Phlox: 6 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Collomia linearisNarrow-leaf collomiaThree pre-1940 collections by Anderson from Skagway (1) and Hyder (2), and one 1968 collection from Skagway appear to be the only reports of this species from the region.
Gillia capitataBluehead Gilia
Microsteris gracilisSlender Phlox
Polemonium acutiflorumTall Jacob's-ladder
Polemonium borealeNorthern Jacob's-ladder
Polemonium pulcherrimumPretty Jacob's-ladder

Polygonaceae (Buckwheat: 25 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Bistorta plumosaMeadow Bistort
Bistorta viviparaAlpine BistortFairly Common plant of open meadows from sea level to the low alpine.
Fallopia convolvulusBlack Bindweed
Fallopia japonicaJapanese KnotweedIntroduced weed with potential to be highly invasive.
Fallopia sachalinensisGiant Knotweed
Koenigia islandicaKoenigiaAnnual herb with somewhat fleshy alternate or opposite leaves with waxy stipules. Plants often reddish
Oxyria digynaMountain SorrelEdible herb of gravel bars and well drained rocky sites of upper elevations
Persicaria amphibiaWater Smartweed
Persicaria hydropiperWater-pepper
Persicaria maculosaSpotted Lady's-thumb
Polygonum achoreumLeathery Knotweed
Polygonum arenastrumOval-leaf Knotweed
Polygonum aviculareProstrate Knotweed
Polygonum fowleriFowler's Knotweed
Polygonum humifusumAlaska Knotweed
Polygonum lapathifoliumCurlytop Knotweed
Polygonum minimumBroadleaf Knotweed
Polygonum ramosissimumBushy Knotweed
Rumex acetosellaSheep Sorrel
Rumex arcticusArctic Dock
Rumex crispusCurly Dock
Rumex longifoliusGarden Dock
Rumex obtusifoliusBitter Dock
Rumex occidentalisWestern Dock
Rumex transitoriusBeach Dock

Portulacaceae (Purslane: 7 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Claytonia sarmentosaAlaska Spring Beauty
Claytonia sibiricaSiberian Miner's LettuceCommon plant of open areas.
Claytonia tuberosaTuberous spring beauty
Montia bostockiiBostock's Montia
Montia chamissoiToad-lily
Montia fontanaWater Blinks
Montia parvifoliaSmall-leaved Montia

Primulaceae (Primrose: 9 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Androsace septentrionalisPygmyflower rockjasmineReported from Coronation Island, otherwise seems to be restricted to near the border north of Haines.
Dodecatheon frigidumNorthern shooting star
Dodecatheon jeffreyiTall Mountain Shooting-starPerennial herb with sweet smelling flowers frequent in bogs at mid to upper elevations and fen-like muskegs at lower elevations.
Dodecatheon pulchellumDark-throated Shooting-starPerennial herb freqently found in estuary meadows and above the high tide line on beaches.
Primula cuneifoliaWedge-leaf PrimroseSmall herb of dry subalpine tundra that is easily overlooked when not in bloom. Seems to be somewhat patchy in occurrence with many plants present in limited areas. Probably uncommon overall.
Primula egaliksensisGreenland Primrose
Primula incanaSilvery Primrose
Primula pumilaArctic Primrose
Trientalis borealisBroad-leaf Starflower

Ranunculaceae (Buttercup: 41 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Aconitum delphiniifoliumMonkshoodUncommon perennial herb most often found in subalpine meadows, but also along creeksides, and rarely forest openings. Deeply lobed palmate leaves and showy helmet-shaped blue to purple flowers make this poisonous plant quite distinctive.
Actaea rubraBaneberryUncommon to Fairly Common plant of open low to mid elevation forests, river edges, and beach meadows. Can be found with red or white berries, all quite poisonous.
Anemone drummondiiAlpine Anemone
Anemone multifidaCut-leaf Anemone
Anemone narcissifloraNarcissus-flowered AnemoneFairly common early blooming herb with showy white flowers and divided leaves found in subalpine to alpine meadows just at and above treeline.
Anemone parvifloraNorthern Anemone
Anemone richardsoniiYellow AnemoneYellow-flowered plant of meadows and mountains.
Aquilegia brevistylaBlue ColumbineFNA Range map indicates that this species barely gets into southeast.
Aquilegia flavescensYellow Columbine
Aquilegia formosaColumbineFairly common plant of open places, including beach meadows, road sides, gravel bars, and subalpine meadows.
Caltha leptosepalaMountain Marsh-marigoldUncommon plant of wet subalpine or alpine meadows.
Caltha palustrisYellow Marsh-marigold
Coptis aspleniifoliaFern-leaf GoldthreadLocally abundant wintergreen herb of open forest areas. Flowers are present relatively early, and are easy to overlook. Leaves are not always present at the time of blooming.
Coptis trifoliaThree-leaf GoldthreadCommon small herb with shiny tri-partite leaves found in muskegs.
Delphinium glaucumGlaucous Larkspur
Pulsatilla patensPasque flower
Ranunculus abortivusLittleleaf Buttercup
Ranunculus acrisTall ButtercupApparently only a few collections from the region, this species is fairly common in human impacted areas along the Sitka road system. It presumably occurs in other communities throughout the region.
Ranunculus aquatilisWater Crowfoot
Ranunculus cooleyaeCooley's ButtercupMost common buttercup in subalpine/alpine meadows. Though most sources do not indicate it, this species is also found less commonly at lower elevations. The pattern of distribution at lower elevations is not entirely clear, but it seems fast moving streams - perhaps restricted to locations where cold and/or snowy winters are the norm.
Ranunculus cymbalariaShore Buttercup
Ranunculus eschscholtziiSubalpine ButtercupThis species is widespread throughout the region, primarily in subalpine and lower alpine locations.
Ranunculus flammulaSpearwort
Ranunculus gelidusWetslope Buttercup
Ranunculus gmeliniiSmall Yellow Water-buttercup
Ranunculus hyperboreusArctic Buttercup
Ranunculus lapponicusLapland Buttercup
Ranunculus macouniiMacoun's Buttercup
Ranunculus nivalisSnow ButtercupPrimarily a species from the interior side of the coast range. In southeast Alaska plants have been collected north of Skagway near the border with Canada. This species has also been collected just on the Canadian side of the border outside of Haines.
Ranunculus occidentalisWestern Buttercupvarieties in the region? per FNA, perhaps brevistylis/occidentalis and nelsonii? Plants with many extra petals have been found on Kruzof Island, but subspecies hexasepalus said to be restricted to Haida Gwaii.
Ranunculus orthorhynchusStraight-beak Buttercup
Ranunculus pacificusPacific ButtercupEndemic to Southeast Alaska.
Ranunculus pedatifidusNorthern Buttercup
Ranunculus pensylvanicusPennsylvania Buttercup
Ranunculus pygmaeusPygmy Buttercup
Ranunculus repensCreeping Buttercup
Ranunculus uncinatusLittle Buttercup
Thalictrum alpinumAlpine Meadowrue
Thalictrum occidentaleWestern Meadowrue
Thalictrum sparsiflorumFew-flowered Meadowrue
Thalictrum venulosumVeiny Meadowrue

Rosaceae (Rose: 57 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Alchemilla monticolaHairy Lady's Mantle
Alchemilla subcrenataBroadtooth Lady's-mantle
Amelanchier alnifoliaSaskatoon serviceberry
Argentina anserinaCommon Silverweed
Argentina egediiPacific SilverweedCommon beach plant.
Aruncus dioicusGoat's BeardCommon roadside plant with pinnately compound toothed leaves and white plume-like flowers. Also found along streams, meadows, and forest edges.
Comarum palustrePurple MarshlocksUncommon species of lake edges.
Crataegus douglasiiBlack Hawthorn
Dasiphora fruticosaShrubby Cinquefoil
Dryas drummondiiDrummond's Mountain-avens
Dryas integrifoliaEntire-leaf Mountain-avens
Dryas octopetalaWhite Mountain-avens
Fragaria chiloensisBeach Strawberry
Fragaria virginianaVirginia Strawberry
Geum calthifoliumCaltha-leaved AvenPrimarily found in subalpine and alpine meadows.
Geum macrophyllumLarge-leaf Aven
Geum rossiiRoss' Aven
Luetkea pectinataPartridgefootCommon trailing herb of mid to high elevation tundra and open forest
Malus fuscaPacific CrabappleSmall, often sprawling tree of small islands and beach fringe forest.
Physocarpus capitatusPacific Ninebark
Potentilla arenosaSnow CinquefoilHas been collected at Icy Bay at the northern boundary of the region. http://arctos.database.museum/guid/UAM:Herb:153535
Potentilla argutaTall Cinquefoil
Potentilla diversifoliaVarileaf Cinquefoil
Potentilla gracilisSlender Cinquefoil
Potentilla hippianaWooly Cinquefoil
Potentilla hookerianaHooker's Cinquefoil
Potentilla nanaArctic Cinquefoil
Potentilla niveaSnow Cinquefoil
Potentilla norvegicaRough Cinquefoil
Potentilla pensylvanicaPennsylvania Cinquefoil
Potentilla rubricaulisRocky Mountain Cinquefoil
Potentilla unifloraOne-flower Cinquefoil
Potentilla villosaVillous CinquefoilCommon plant along rocky shorelines where it grows from crevices in the exposed bedrock of the splash zone.
Potentilla villosula
Rosa acicularisPrickly Rose
Rosa nutkanaNootka Rose
Rosa rugosaSitka Rose
Rosa woodsiiPrairie Rose
Rubus arcticusNagoonberry
Rubus armeniacusHimalayan Blackberry
Rubus chamaemorusCloudberry
Rubus discolorHimalayan Blackberry
Rubus idaeusAmerican Red Raspberry
Rubus leucodermisWestern Black RaspberryReported to occur throughout the region, but there are apparently no collection records or specific locations where it has been documented.
Rubus parviflorusThimbleberry
Rubus pedatusTrailing Raspberry
Rubus spectabilisSalmonberryCommon shrub found from sea level to subalpine. Favors open areas where it can form nearly impenetrable thickets. Fruit comes in red and orange-yellow forms.
Sanguisorba annuaPrairie Burnet
Sanguisorba canadensisCanadian Burnet
Sanguisorba menziesiiMenzies' Burnet
Sanguisorba officinalisCommon Burnet
Sibbaldia procumbensSibbaldia
Sorbus aucupariaEuropean Mountain Ash
Sorbus scopulinaWestern Mountain Ash
Sorbus sitchensisSitka Mountain Ash
Spiraea douglasiiRose Spiraea
Spiraea steveniiBeauverd SpiraeaSmall to medium sized woody shrub with flat topped to hemispheric shaped inflorescence. Individual flowers pink in bud, but white when fully open. Leaves with toothed margins.

Rubiaceae (Madder: 5 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Galium aparineCleaversCommon along many beaches.
Galium borealeNorthern bedstraw
Galium kamtschaticumBoreal Bedstraw
Galium trifidumSmall Bedstraw
Galium triflorumSweet-scented Bedstraw

Salicaceae (Willow: 32 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Populus balsamiferaBalsam PoplarUnclear whether this species occurs in Southeast Alaska. Herbarium records are all of Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa (Populus trichocarpa) and it seems plausible that this species is restricted to interior regions of BC into Yukon and Alaska - not reaching the coast before South Central Alaska.
Populus tremuloidesQuaking Aspen
Populus trichocarpaBlack Cottonwood
Salix alaxensisFeltleaf WillowUnderside of leaves with a dense white or creamy felt
Salix arbusculoidesLittletree WillowMid sized shrub or tree with narrowly elliptic leaves and leaf-like stipules
Salix arcticaArctic WillowDwarf shrub with erect or trailing branches
Salix barclayiBarclay's WillowShrubs to 6ft tall, leaf out and flowering co-occur
Salix barrattianaBarratt's WillowUpright shrub to 2ft with often vertical leaves grey with long hairs
Salix bebbianaBebb WillowLarge shrub or small tree frequently with diamond pattern on the trunks.
Salix boothiiBooth's Willow
Salix brachycarpaShortfruit WillowShort to mid sized shrub with globose catkins
Salix candidaSage-leaf WillowLow to mid sized shrub with narrowly ellipitic leaves found in floodplains and calcareous fens and meadows.
Salix commutataUndergreen WillowDensely branching shrub between 3-6ft tall
Salix farriaeFarr's Willow
Salix fuscescensAlaska Bog WillowLow shrub with trailing stems
Salix glaucaGrayleaf WillowHighly variable short to tall shrub
Salix hookerianaCoastal WillowShort to mid sized shrub
Salix interiorNarrow-leaf WillowMid sized shrubs to trees found on sand bars. Spreads clonally by root shoots.
Salix lasiandraPacific Willow
Salix myrtillifoliaLow Blueberry WillowLow spreading shrub to 2ft, plants spreading by layering
Salix niphocladaBarrenground WillowLow to mid sized shrub
Salix planifoliaDiamondleaf WillowLow to tall shrubs with precocious catkins
Salix polarisPolar WillowDwarf shrub of moist late snowfields and scree slopes
Salix prolixaMackenzie's WillowMedium to tall shrubs
Salix pulchraTea-leaved WillowLow to tall shrubs with linear leaf-like stipules and precocious flowering
Salix reticulataNetleaf WillowDwarf shrub with distinct reticulate leaves
Salix richardsoniiRichardson's WillowLow to tall shrubs with precocious catkins
Salix rotundifoliaLeast WillowDwarf shrub with erect stems
Salix scoulerianaScouler's WillowTall shrubs or trees
Salix setchellianaSetchell's WillowDwarf shrub endemic to Alaska, the Yukon and extreme northwestern British Columbia
Salix sitchensisSitka WillowMid sized shrub to tree with subprecious to coetaneous catkins. Leaves have distinctive silky hairs on undersurface
Salix stoloniferaCreeping WillowDwarf shrub with above or below ground trailing branches

Santalaceae (Sandalwood: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Geocaulon lividumNorthern Comandra

Saxifragaceae (Saxifrage: 32 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Chrysosplenium tetrandrumNorthern Golden Saxifrage
Heuchera glabraSmooth AlumrootCommon wintergreen herb of cliffs, rock outcrops and rock walls.
Leptarrhena pyrolifoliaLeather-leaf Saxifrage
Micranthes ferrugineaAlaska Saxifrage
Micranthes foliolosaLeafystem Saxifrage
Micranthes hieracifoliaHawkweed-leaved Saxifrage
Micranthes lyalliiRed-stem Saxifrage
Micranthes nelsonianaHeart-leaf Saxifrage
Micranthes nivalisAlpine Saxifrage
Micranthes occidentalisWestern Saxifrage
Micranthes razshiviniiAlaska Saxifrage
Micranthes reflexaReflexed Saxifrage
Micranthes tolmieiTolmie's Saxifrage
Mitella nudaNaked Mitrewort
Mitella pentandraAlpine Mitrewort
Mitella trifidaThree-tooth Mitrewort
Saxifraga adscendensWedge-leaved Saxifrage
Saxifraga bronchialisYellowdot Saxifrage
Saxifraga caespitosaTufted Saxifrage
Saxifraga cernuaNodding Saxifrage
Saxifraga cherlerioides
Saxifraga eschscholtziiCushion Saxifrage
Saxifraga flagellarisWhiplash Saxifrage
Saxifraga hyperboreaPygmy Saxifrage
Saxifraga mertensianaWood Saxifrage
Saxifraga oppositifoliaPurple Mountain Saxifrage
Saxifraga rivularisWeak Saxifrage
Saxifraga serpyllifoliaThyme-leaved Saxifrage
Saxifraga tricuspidataThree-toothed Saxifrage
Tellima grandifloraFringecup
Tiarella trifoliataFoamflower
Tolmiea menziesiiYouth-on-age

Solanaceae (Potato: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Solanum nigrumBlack Nightshade

Urticaceae (Nettle: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Urtica dioicaStinging NettlesAn uncommon herb with modified hairs equipped with defensive chemicals. Found in open forests and meadows.

Valerianaceae (Valerian: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Valeriana capitataCapitate Valerian
Valeriana sitchensisSitka Valerian

Violaceae (Violet: 12 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Viola aduncaEarly Violet
Viola bifloraArctic Yellow Violet
Viola canadensisCanadian White Violet
Viola epipsilaMarsh Violet
Viola glabellaStream Violet
Viola langsdorffiiAlaska Violet
Viola macloskeyiSmall White Violet
Viola nephrophyllaNorthern Bog Violet
Viola palustrisMarsh Violet
Viola renifoliaWhite Violet
Viola selkirkiiSelkirk's Violet
Viola sempervirensEvergreen Violet

Viscaceae (Mistletoe: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Arceuthobium tsugenseHemlock Dwarf MistletoeProbably Common, though rarely observed directly. Only three collections in ARCTOS, all from the mainland.


Monocots (Liliopsida)

Araceae (Arum Lily: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Lysichiton americanusSkunk Cabbage

Cyperaceae (Sedges: 104 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Bolboschoenus maritimusBayonet-grass
Carex albonigraBlack-and-white Sedge
Carex anthoxantheaYellow-flowered SedgeFairly Common sedge of wet meadows and grassy areas.
Carex aquatilisSitka SedgeCommon rhizomatous sedge of wet areas.
Carex arctaNorthern Clustered Sedge
Carex atherodesWheat Sedge
Carex athrostachyaSlenderbeak sedgeTuft formed sedge with head-like aggregate of spikes
Carex atratiformisBlack sedgeTuft forming sedge with multiple stipitate spikes.
Carex atrosquamaBlack-scaled Sedge
Carex aureaGolden Sedge
Carex bebbiiBebb's sedgeTufted sedge with multiple spikes crowded into an oval head
Carex bicolorTwo-color Sedge
Carex bigelowiiBigelow's Sedge
Carex brunnescensBrownish Sedge
Carex buxbaumiiBuxbaum's Sedge
Carex canescensSilvery Sedge
Carex capillarisHair-like Sedge
Carex capitataCapitate Sedge
Carex chordorrhizaCreeping Sedge
Carex circinataCoiled Sedge
Carex concinnaLow northern sedgeLoosely tufted sedge with hairy perigynia
Carex concinnoidesNorthwestern Sedge
Carex crawfordiiCrawford sedgetufted sedge
Carex diandraLesser Tussock Sedge
Carex dispermaSoft-leaf Sedge
Carex echinataStar SedgeProbably Fairly Common in the area.
Carex filifoliaThread leaf sedgeDensely tufted sedge with single androgynous spikes with hairy perigynia
Carex flavaYellow Sedge
Carex foeneaBronze Sedge
Carex fuliginosaShort-leaf sedge
Carex garberiElk Sedge
Carex glacialisGlacier sedge
Carex glareosaClustered sedge
Carex gmeliniiGmelin's Sedge
Carex gynocratesNorthern bog sedgeSedge with single spikes which may be female only, male only or androgynous
Carex hoodiiHood's Sedge
Carex interiorInland Sedge
Carex krauseiKraus' Sedge
Carex lachenaliiHare's Foot Sedge
Carex laeviculmisSmooth-stem Sedge
Carex lasiocarpaSlender Sedge
Carex lenticularisLakeshore SedgeCommon clump forming sedge of wet places, including road sides.
Carex leptaleaBristle-stalk Sedge
Carex limosaShore Sedge
Carex lividaLivid SedgeLocally common muskeg sedge with distinctive pale blue-green leaves.
Carex loliaceaRyegrass Sedge
Carex lyngbyeiLyngbye's SedgeCommon sedge of estuaries and upper beaches. Also found in other wet areas.
Carex mackenzieiMackenzie's Sedge
Carex maclovianaThick-headed Sedge
Carex macrocephalaLarge-head SedgeRhizomatous sedge locally common near the high tide line on sandy beaches.
Carex macrochaetaLong-awned SedgeCommon sedge with nodding spikes and distinctive long awns found in open areas
Carex magellanicaBoreal bog sedge
Carex maritimaCurved Sedge
Carex mediaAlpine Sedge
Carex membranaceaFragile sedge
Carex mertensiiMertens' SedgeSedge with short cylindrical nodding spikes found along trails, forest openings and roadsides in the Sitka area.
Carex microchaetaShortawned Sedge
Carex microglochinFew-seeded Bog Sedge
Carex micropodaPyrenean sedgeProbably occurs in the Sitka area.
Carex nardinaSpike Sedge
Carex nigricansAlpine Black Sedge
Carex obnuptaSlough sedge
Carex pachystachyaChamisso SedgeSee also Carex preslii
Carex paucifloraFew-flowered SedgeCommon small sedge with few terminal reflexed perigynia found in muskegs
Carex petasataBroad-wing Sedge
Carex phaeocephalaDunhead Sedge
Carex plurifloraMany-flowered SedgeCommon small sedge with distinctive dark bracts found in muskegs.
Carex podocarpaShort stalk sedge
Carex praticolaMeadow sedge
Carex presliiPresl's sedgeMay not be uncommon - very similar to Carex pachystachya
Carex rossiiRoss sedge
Carex rostrataBeaked Sedge
Carex rupestrisCurly Sedge
Carex saxatilisRock Sedge
Carex scirpoideaNorthern Single-spike Sedge
Carex spectabilisShowy Sedge
Carex stipataSawbeak Sedge
Carex stylosaVariegated SedgeAbundance is unclear, but it seems like it's probably at least Uncommon.
Carex tahoensisTahoe Sedge
Carex tenuifloraSparse-flowered Sedge
Carex utriculataNorthwest Territory Sedge
Carex vaginataSheathed Sedge
Carex viridulaLittle Green Sedge
Dulichium arundinaceumDulichium
Eleocharis acicularisNeedle spikerush
Eleocharis kamtschaticaKamchatka Spikerush
Eleocharis macrostachyaPale Spike-rush
Eleocharis palustrisCommon Spikerush
Eleocharis uniglumisOne-scale Spikerush
Eriophorum angustifoliumTall Cottongrass
Eriophorum brachyantherumShort-anthered cottongrass
Eriophorum callitrixArctic Cottongrass
Eriophorum chamissonisRusset Cottongrass
Eriophorum gracileSlender Cottongrass
Eriophorum scheuchzeriWhite Cottongrass
Eriophorum viridicarinatumGreen-keeled cottongrass
Kobresia myosuroidesBellardi bog sedge
Kobresia simpliciusculaSimple bog sedge
Rhynchospora albaWhite Beak-sedge
Schoenoplectus subterminalisSwaying Rush
Schoenoplectus tabernaemontaniSoftstem Bulrush
Scirpus microcarpusSmall-flowered Bulrush
Trichophorum alpinumAlpine Bulrush
Trichophorum cespitosumTufted BulrushCommon clump forming sedge of most low to mid elevation muskegs.

Iridaceae (Iris: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Iris setosaBeachhead Iris
Sisyrinchium littoraleAlaska Blue-eyed Grass

Juncaceae (Rush: 28 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Juncus alpinoarticulatusAlpine Rush
Juncus arcticusArctic Rush
Juncus articulatusJointed Rush
Juncus biglumisTwo-flowered rush
Juncus bufoniusToad Rush
Juncus castaneusChestnut Rush
Juncus drummondiiDrummond's Rush
Juncus dudleyiDudley's Rush
Juncus effususBog Rush
Juncus ensifoliusDagger-leaf Rush
Juncus falcatusSickle-leaved Rush
Juncus filiformisThread rushPerennial rhizomatous with round stems and sheath-like leaves
Juncus mertensianusMertens' Rush
Juncus nodosusKnotted RushApparently only a single (1927) collection from Gravina Island. There appear to be no other collections from anywhere near Southeast Alaska (based on e-Flora BC map).
Juncus stygiusMoor Rush
Juncus supiniformisHairy-leaf Rush
Juncus tenuisPoverty Rush
Juncus triglumisThree-flowered Rush
Luzula arcticaTundra spikerush
Luzula arcuataAlpine Woodrush
Luzula comosaPacific Woodrush
Luzula confusaNorthern Woodrush
Luzula multifloraCommon Woodrush
Luzula parvifloraSmall-flowered Woodrush
Luzula piperiPiper's Woodrush
Luzula rufescensHairy woodrush
Luzula spicataSpiked Woodrush
Luzula wahlenbergiiWahlenberg's Woodrush

Juncaginaceae (Arrowgrass: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Triglochin maritimaArrowgrass
Triglochin palustrisMarsh arrowgrass

Liliaceae (Lily: 16 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Allium schoenoprasumWild Chive
Anticlea elegansMountain Death Camas
Clintonia unifloraBride's Bonnet
Fritillaria camschatcensisNorthern Rice Root
Lloydia serotinaAlplily
Maianthemum dilatatumDeerheart
Maianthemum racemosumFalse Solmon's-seal
Maianthemum stellatumStarry False Solomon's-seal
Streptopus amplexifoliusClasping TwistedstalkCommon plant of open coniferous forest, mostly at low elevations. Edible shoots when young (with cucumber-like flavor), but note superficial resemblance to poisonous Corn Lily (Veratrum viride). Most easily distinguished from Rosy Twistedstalk (S. lanceolatus) and Small Twistedstalk (S. streptopoides) by large size and branching stems.
Streptopus lanceolatusRosy TwistedstalkCommon herb often found on the forest floor, especially near edges where there is only moderate shading, from low to elevations to treeline. Distinguished most easily from other Clasping twistedstalks (S. amplexifolius) and Small Twistedstalk (Streptopus streptopoides) by rosy colored flowers and intermediate size without branching stems.
Streptopus streptopoidesSmall TwistedstalkCommon small herb of coniferous forest. Seems to favor shaded mossy floors of mature coniferous forest, where it can be abundant.
Tofieldia coccineaNorthern Asphodel
Tofieldia pusillaScotch False-asphodel
Triantha glutinosaSticky False Asphodel
Triantha occidentalisWestern False Asphodel
Veratrum virideCorn Lily

Orchidaceae (Orchids: 26 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Amerorchis rotundifoliaRoundleaf OrchidThis species has not collected in Southeast Alaska, though there are several collections on the BC side of the border between Skagway and Whitehorse (see e-flora BC link below). However based on the collection records through out BC and Alaska, it appears this species is typically found on the landward side of the coastal mountains, so it may not occur anywhere in Southeast Alaska.
Calypso bulbosaFairy SlipperBased on collections and reports, this species seems to be found almost entirely in spruce forests near shorelines, primarily on small islands (though it is abundant in locations on Kruzof Island near Sitka). One collection inland from Haines is an exception. These are presumed to be var. occidentalis though the FNA distribution map does not have this species occurring much in our region. Do our restricted coastal populations possibly show genetic evidence of separation from the rest of the species throughout the bulk of its range?
Coeloglossum virideLong-bracted Bog-orchid
Corallorhiza maculataSpotted CoralrootThe e-flora BC map shows many collection records from Southeast Alaska, while the distribution map in FNA suggests this species does not occur in our region, but the similar looking C. mertensiana does. C. mertensiana was formerly considered a subspecies of C. maculata, and it's possible the collections labeled as such are older collections which would be better called C. mertensiana at this time.
Corallorhiza mertensianaMertens' CoralrootLocally abundant and widespread in forested areas.
Corallorhiza trifidaNorthern Coral-root
Cypripedium montanumMountain Lady's Slipper
Cypripedium parviflorumGreater Yellow Lady's Slipper
Cypripedium passerinumNorthern Lady's-slipperCollected from near Haines
Goodyera oblongifoliaRattlesnake PlantainEvergreen orchid found in uplifted beach forests. The white central stripe and netting of the leaves is unmistakable.
Listera borealisNorthern Twayblade
Listera caurinaNorthwestern TwaybladeLocally uncommon small orchid of moderately to higly productive forests. The broad entire lip of the flower and broad leaves distinguish this species from Heart-leaved Twayblade (Listera cordata).
Listera convallaroidesBroad-lipped Twayblade
Listera cordataHeart-leaved TwaybladeSmall two-leaved perennial orchid common in moderately to highly productive forests
Malaxis monophyllosWhite Adder's-mouth
Malaxis paludosaBog Adder's-mouth
Piperia candidaWhite-lip Rein OrchidNo collections from Southeast Alaska. This species' primary range is western Washington, Oregon and Northern California. It is considered rare in BC where it has apparently been found on Dundas Island, not far south of the border with Alaska, so it may yet be found in the extreme southern part of our region.
Piperia unalascensisAlaska Bog-orchid
Platanthera aquilonisNorthern Green Bog Orchid
Platanthera chorisianaChoris' Bog-orchidInfrequently found small orchid of bogs. The two oval basal leaves and spurred flowers distinguish it from other bog orchids.
Platanthera dilatataWhite Bog-orchidSlender white flowered orchid found in beach meadows and rich fens.
Platanthera huronensisGreen Bog-orchidCollection records suggest this species is found primarily in the northern part of Southeast Alaska.
Platanthera obtusataSmall Bog-orchidA small whitish green flowered orchid found in forested beach fringe in northern southeast Alaska.
Platanthera orbiculataPad-leaved Bog-orchidLarge rare orchid with a single pair of broadly oval basal leaves found in productive forests
Platanthera strictaSlender Bog-orchidCommon greenish flowered orchid of bog-forest transitions and fens.
Spiranthes romanzoffianaHooded Ladies-tresses

Poaceae (Grasses: 114 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Agrostis capillarisColonial BentgrassIntroduced grass
Agrostis exarataSpike Redtop
Agrostis giganteaRedtopIntroduced grass of waste places
Agrostis mertensiiRed BentgrassReported from Chichagof Island.
Agrostis oregonensisOregon BentgrassNot reported from the region, but has been found immediately south of the border and may occur in extreme southern Southeast.
Agrostis pallensSeashore BentgrassNot reported from Southeast Alaska, but may occur in the extreme southern part of the region.
Agrostis scabraTicklegrassCommon grass of open areas.
Agrostis stoloniferaCreeping BentgrassIntroduced grass of wasteplaces
Aira caryophylleaSilver Hairgrass
Aira praecoxYellow Hairgrass
Alopecurus aequalisShort-awn Foxtail
Alopecurus geniculatusWater FoxtailIntroduced in Southeast Alaska.
Alopecurus pratensisMeadow FoxtailIntroduced to Southeast Alaska.
Anthoxanthum hirtumNorthern Sweetgrass
Anthoxanthum monticolaAlpine Sweetgrass
Anthoxanthum odoratumSweet Vernal GrassIntroduced grass with contracted or spike-like panicle
Arctagrostis latifoliaPolargrass
Arctophila fulvaPendant GrassReported from Glacier Bay.
Arrhenatherum elatiusTall oatgrass
Avena fatuaWild Oat
Beckmannia syzigachneAmerican sloughgrass
Bromus aleutensisAleutian Brome
Bromus carinatusCalifornia bromeAnnual or biennial grass native from British Columbia south to California, introduced to the Yukon and northern southeast Alaska
Bromus ciliatusFringed bromePerennial tufted grass with open nodding panicles
Bromus commutatusMeadow BromeGrass Manual map does not show any records for the area.
Bromus hordeaceusSoft Brome
Bromus inermisSmooth Brome
Bromus pacificusPacific BromeProbably fairly common
Bromus pumpellianusArctic Brome
Bromus richardsoniiRichardson BromeIt's unclear whether this occurs in the area (Grass Manual maps suggests no), or whether it's better called B. ciliatus (USDA-PLANTS says yes, and Grass Manual map suggests it's closer to here than B. richardsonii).
Bromus secalinusRye bromeWeedy annual grass with stongly flattened, awned spikelets
Bromus sitchensisAlaska Brome
Bromus sterilisPoverty Brome
Bromus tectorumCheatgrass
Bromus vulgarisColumbia Brome
Calamagrostis canadensisBluejoint
Calamagrostis lapponicaLapland reedgrassLarge perennial grass with narrow panicles
Calamagrostis nutkaensisPacific ReedgrassCommon rhizomatous grass of estuary meadows and of Sitka spruce dominated headlands.
Calamagrostis purpurascensPurple reedgrassPerennial tufted grass with a spike-like panicle
Calamagrostis strictaNorthern Reedgrass
Cinna latifoliaWoodreed
Dactylis glomerataOrchard Grass
Danthonia intermediaTimber Oatgrass
Danthonia spicataPoverty Oatgrass
Deschampsia cespitosaTufted Hairgrass
Deschampsia danthonioidesAnnual hairgrassGrass manual suggests it does not occur in Southeast Alaska.
Deschampsia elongataSlender HairgrassGrass manual does not indicate presence of this species in Southeast Alaska.
Deschampsia flexuosaWavy HairgrassGrass manual map does not indicate records from Alaska.
Elymus alaskanusAlaskan Wheatgrass
Elymus glaucusWestern Ryegrass
Elymus hirsutusNorthern Ryegrass
Elymus repensQuackgrassIntroduced
Elymus trachycaulusSlender Wheatgrass
Elymus x yukonensisYukon Wheatgrass
Festuca altaicaRough fescuePerennial tufted grass with open panicles and purplish-bronze spikelets found in open areas of upper elevations
Festuca baffinensisBaffin Fescue
Festuca brachyphyllaAlpine Fescue
Festuca occidentalisWestern Fescue
Festuca rubraRed Fescue
Festuca saximontanaRocky Mountain Fescue
Festuca subulataBearded Fescue
Festuca viviparoideaNorthern Fescue
Glyceria borealisSmall Floating Mannagrass
Glyceria grandisAmerican mannagrassPerennial rhizomatous grass with open panicles each spike with 4-5 flowers
Glyceria leptostachyaDavy mannagrass
Glyceria striataFowl mannagrassPerennial tufted grass
Holcus lanatusCommon Velvetgrass
Hordeum brachyantherumMeadow Barley
Hordeum jubatumFoxtail Barley
Hordeum vulgareBarleyThough probably cultivated in historic times, it seems unlikely that this species has naturalized in the area.
Leymus mollisDune GrassRobust bluish grass often forming extensive colonies just above the high tide line
Lolium multiflorumItalian Ryegrass
Lolium perennePerennial Ryegrass
Melica subulataAlaska oniongrass
Phalaris arundinaceaReed Canarygrass
Phalaris canariensisAnnual Canarygrass
Phippsia algidaIcegrass
Phleum alpinumAlpine Timothy
Phleum pratenseTimothy
Poa alpinaAlpine BluegrassTufted grass with wide basal leaves and fat spikelets found at high elevations and colder microsites.
Poa annuaAnnual Bluegrass
Poa arcticaArctic Bluegrass
Poa compressaCanada Bluegrass
Poa eminensLarge-flower SpeargrassRhizomatous grass of beaches, tide flats and brackish meadows. The large compact inflorescence is distinctive.
Poa glaucaGlaucous Bluegrass
Poa laxifloraLooseflower Bluegrass
Poa leptocomaBog Bluegrass
Poa macranthaSeashore Bluegrass
Poa macrocalyxLarge-glume Bluegrass
Poa nemoralisWood Bluegrass
Poa palustrisFowl Bluegrass
Poa paucispiculaAlaska Bluegrass
Poa pratensisKentucky Bluegrass
Poa pseudoabbreviataPolar Bluegrass
Poa secundaPine Bluegrass
Poa stenanthaNorthern Bluegrass
Poa trivialisRough Bluegrass
Podagrostis aequivalvisNorthern BentgrassAbundance uncertain.
Podagrostis humilisAlpine BentgrassGrass of wet meadows mostly in the alpine.
Polypogon monspeliensisRabbitfoot Grass
Pseudoroegneria spicataBluebunch WheatgrassGiven overall range of species, collection record from Southeast indicated on e-Flora BC map may need to be verified.
Puccinellia distansWeeping Alkaligrass
Puccinellia nutkaensisPacific Alkaligrass
Puccinellia nuttallianaNuttall's Alkaligrass
Puccinellia phryganodesCreeping Alkaligrass
Puccinellia pumilaDwarf Alkaligrass
Schedonorus arundinaceusTall Fescue
Schedonorus pratensisMeadow Fescue
Schizachne purpurascensFalse Melic
Torreyochloa pallidaPale False Mannagrass
Trisetum canescensTall Trisetum
Trisetum cernuumNodding Trisetum
Trisetum spicatumDowny Oatgrass
Vahlodea atropurpureaMountain Hairgrass

Potamogetonaceae (Pondweed: 14 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Potamogeton alpinusAlpine Pondweed
Potamogeton epihydrusRibbonleaf Pondweed
Potamogeton foliosusClosed-leaf Pondweed
Potamogeton friesiiFlat-stalked Pondweed
Potamogeton gramineusVariable Pondweed
Potamogeton natansFloating Pondweed
Potamogeton perfoliatusClasping-leaf Pondweed
Potamogeton praelongusWhite-stem Pondweed
Potamogeton pusillusSmall Pondweed
Potamogeton richardsoniiRichardson's Pondweed
Potamogeton zosteriformisFlatstem Pondweed
Stuckenia filiformisFineleaf Pondweed
Stuckenia pectinataSago Pondweed
Stuckenia vaginataSheathed Pondweed

Ruppiaceae (Ditchgrass: 2 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Ruppia cirrhosaSpiral Ditchgrass
Ruppia maritimaWidgeongrass

Scheuchzeriaceae (Scheuchzeria: 1 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Scheuchzeria palustrisRannoch-rush

Sparganiaceae (Burreed: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Sparganium angustifoliumNarrow-leaf Burreed
Sparganium hyperboreumNorthern Burreed
Sparganium natansSmall Burreed

Zosteraceae (Eelgrass: 3 species)

Scientific NameCommon NameSummary
Phyllospadix scouleriScouler's Surfgrass
Phyllospadix serrulatusToothed Surfgrass
Zostera marinaEelgrass